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Advertising on T.V.- How important and effective is it?

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Introduction

Media Coursework Advertising on T.V.- How important and effective is it? Is everybody except for me smart, middle-class and impeccably turned out every minute of the day? Or is this a myth suggested by television advertisements to sell more of their products? In this, I propose to examine how important and effective advertising is, and what effect it has on our society. To do this, I will look at why advertising started, at some individual, long-running, successful adverts, and at shorter adverts, and at how these adverts achieve their purpose. One of the main reasons that television advertisements were introduced was to make I.T.V. pay for itself. I.T.V. stands for International Television, and people in Britain wanted this extra channel, so that they could have more choice in the programmes that they watched, like the Americans had. Before I.T.V., the only British television channels were B.B.C. 1 (British Broadcasting Corporation 1) and B.B.C. 2. These were paid for by television licences, which was a certain amount of money paid each year to the government by every household that owned a television. To cover the costs of I.T.V., there needed to be either an additional licence, or other means of funding, which would have made television less accessible to poorer people. Instead of an additional licence, I.T.V. introduced television advertisements, which meant that companies would pay I.T.V. ...read more.

Middle

Another technique used when advertising a product can be using a famous person. In the adverts for Walkers crisps, Gary Lineker, an ex-footballer, is used. Gary Lineker is instantly recognisable, and very popular. He played for England on numerous occasions but never got booked. Gary Lineker was born in Leicester, and first played for Leicester City FC, while Walkers crisps are based in Leicester, and sponsor Leicester City so there are strong links between them. Gary has appeared in the Walkers crisps adverts as a nun, a baby, a punk rocker, a devil and a muscleman, and in every advert he steals the crisps from a small child. Everybody watching the adverts knows that Gary Lineker is very reliable and well-behaved, and would never really steal a child's crisps, but the idea is that anybody will turn to criminal activity to get some Walkers crisps, as they are so tasty. This advert was successful, as people were shocked by Gary stealing the crisps from a child, and so paid attention, and the message that Walkers crisps are too good to resist was got over clearly. A technique that has been used in lots of recent adverts is called autosuggestion. This is when the advert encourages the viewer to use insight and form an impression. The advert then surprises the viewer by showing the impression to be wrong. ...read more.

Conclusion

This has, in most cases, raised the standard of television programmes, although it has reduced the number of specialised television programmes that not many people watched, but were very good all the same. Adverts have opened up the market and made for more consumer choice. This is a good thing, as it keeps products' standards high, and prices reasonable as the companies have more competition for customers. On the other hand, there are some disadvantages of adverts, such as making people want things that they can't afford, or making them feel guilty that they can't afford to buy things that their children see and want. Also, some adverts give people false ideas about what the product can do, like beauty creams which claim to reduce wrinkles dramatically, but show a model that didn't have any wrinkles in the first place, so people buy the product with false expectations of what it can do. Some sociologists have claimed that there are far more deep-rooted, psychological implications of adverts, such as damage to family life. They say that this is caused by all the pictures of perfect families in adverts, which make us less likely to work on our family problems as we realise that we are far off being perfect. Also, the seemingly perfect models in adverts may cause low self-esteem, and contribute to the rise in cases of eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. Overall, I think television adverts are a good thing, and we could not cope without them in today's society. ...read more.

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