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Some people say that religious beliefs can be neither justified nor refuted by reason

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Introduction

Some people say that religious beliefs can be neither justified nor refuted by reason. However, while sometimes this claim is used as a reason for rejecting religious beliefs, at other times it is used to conclude that these beliefs are established by faith. To what extent is faith a legitimate basis for knowledge claims, in religion and different Areas of Knowledge? In order to fully understand the legitimacy of faith as a basis for knowledge claims, one must first look at how faith is affected by the three ways of knowing: emotion, perception, and reason. Firstly, faith is the adherence to an idea or theory without any necessary concrete proof of the concept; this notion can be something as small as a specific superstition to something as significant as a way of living and approaching one's values and morals. In order to understand the question that's being asked, one must first realize why people have faith and its importance in our society as a whole. Even though faith is not restricted to religion and the belief in God, all forms of faith are caused mostly by emotions rather than actual concrete evidence. ...read more.

Middle

Reason also plays an important role in our faith. The title of this topic says: "Religious beliefs can be neither justified nor refuted by reason ...while sometimes this claim is used as a reason for rejecting religious beliefs, at other times it is used to conclude that these beliefs are established by faith." Firstly, I would like to say that there are several unclear assumptions in the first part of the question. It is unclear what the author of the question means when he says "rejecting religious beliefs." He goes on to say that at OTHER times they this claim to prove that these beliefs are established by faith. The fact that beliefs are established by faith is a given; after all people say do you believe in god or do you believe the Koran. In fact faith has become an almost 'divine' word in the religion. One must not see religion as an Area of Knowledge but rather an area of trust and belief. In fact all 'Areas of Knowledge' should be called 'Areas of Trust and Belief '. Everything that we know and learn is based on us trusting who ever is giving us the information. ...read more.

Conclusion

People who believe in God are just as happy as those who don't believe in God. The unhappy people take extremist points of view which has negative results on our society. There have been many instances in history where religion has been inserted without any negative consequences. Even if we accept the argument that the bible was just written to limit the chaos in the world, there is not motivation for 'opening up the eyes' of religious people because it never results in anything positive. I think that faith has neither a negative nor a positive effect on our Areas of Knowledge. Thus, faith is a legitimate basis for knowledge claims- however, when these knowledge claims are used to argue reason, the whole point of the argument is lost. 1 Once again we come across a situation where a distinction between faith and belief is appropriate- even though the Christian believes in what is said in the bible, he has faith in God or whichever saint is represented on the picture. Faith in something holy saving his life and keeping him safe throughout his journeys is a strong one; this faith is something beyond the group of beliefs that is commonly accepted in Christianity. 2 http://www.leaderu.com/marshill/mhr02/shaw1.html 3 wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn 4 http://www.mises.org/easier/R.asp ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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