• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Chlorophyll transfers.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Chlorophyll transfers H+ electrons by a process known as resonance transfer across thylakoid membranes to P700 and P680 type chlorophyll a molecules. Chlorophyll, with the aid of enzymes, converts light energy into chemical energy by a complex series of processes of oxidation involving loss of electrons. In these processes carbon dioxide and water are converted to glucose and oxygen. aim I aim to investigate the effects of the quantity of light and thus the light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis in Elodea. Background Photosynthesis is the production of food compounds from carbon dioxide and water by green plants using energy from sunlight, absorbed by chlorophyll ie. Photosynthesis is how plants feed. C6H12O6 + 6O2(6CO2 + 6H2O Raw materials Products ie. ...read more.

Middle

for the plant. It is only when the rate of photosynthesis is greater than the rate of respiration that CO2 will be taken in and excess O2 given out. ie. In darkness O2 is taken in and CO2 is given out - there is no p/s; in dim light the rate of respiration and p/s is equal - there is no gaseous exchange with the air; in bright light however p/s is faster than respiration and thus O2 is given out - CO2 is taken in to use for p/s and the CO2 made from the plant's respiration is also used to make O2. ie. The more light (the higher the light intensity), the greater the rate of p/s - unto the LSP [see below]. ...read more.

Conclusion

either CO2, H2O or temperature will be the limiting factor. 5/4805/94805/image002.jpg"> As the amount of CO2 available increases, the rate of p/s increases, until the plant is photosynthesising as fast as it can - the CSP - CO2 Saturation Point. If both CO2 and light supply are increased together, the rate of p/s will level out. Henceforth it is limited, according to Blackman's Law, by the factor in least supply, either H2O or temperature. however there is a physical limitation of the carbon dioxide diffusion and the plant's sunlight absorption. 5/4805/94805/image003.jpg"> At a lower temperature, the rate of p/s is increasing with increasing LI or CO2 availability, but the LSP or CSP is quickly reached. At a higher temperature, the rate of p/s increased further and reaches the LSP / CSP slower. Thus we can se that temperature affects the rate of p/s - it is higher at higher temperatures. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Green Plants as Organisms section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Green Plants as Organisms essays

  1. How temperature affects the rate of photosynthesis.

    The scalpel had to be used under water to cut the elodea and it was hard to look at what angle the elodea was being cut. So it can be said that the elodeas used were cut at different angles if measured precisely.

  2. The effects of organic effluent from the seweage on the biodiversty in a freshwater ...

    ---Oxygen solubility in water is low and varies with temperature, the lower the temperature the more oxygen dissolves. But the temperature in the environment is always fluctuating so the readings taken by the oxygen meter for oxygen may not be reliable.

  1. Absorption Spectrum of Chlorophyll.

    The short-lived fluorescent state is produced by the excitation of either the blue or red absorption band. Electrons return to their ground states by emission of fluorescence, dissipation of heat or by a chemical reaction. A possibility of transferring the energy from one pigment molecule to another also exists.

  2. Poikilohydry in mosses: an ecological limitation or opportunity?

    not possess true roots, with rhizoids present for anchorage on the substratum 3. As the root system is deficient, mosses depend largely upon the direct absorption of water through the leaves. Owing to the failure of the gametophyte to produce true vascular tissue with support structures they are unable to

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work