• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Cookies experiment Aim: To find out what type of powder reacts more towards heat and therefore expanding inside a cookie mix. Prediction: Based on the research I maid I think that the powder with the least different type of carbohydrates and elements wi

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Cookies experiment Aim: To find out what type of powder reacts more towards heat and therefore expanding inside a cookie mix. Prediction: Based on the research I maid I think that the powder with the least different type of carbohydrates and elements will be the one to heat up faster. When it heats up faster each grain expands much more making the cookie longer. Method: 1. Make the base cookie mix 2. Using the same shape cutter cut 6 cookies from the cookie mix with similar attributes. 3. Put in different containers a teaspoon of each of the following powders: sugar, coffee, cereal crumbs, chocolate milk powder and cinnamon. 4. Put one cookie sized mixes into the container with sugar and make sure the sugar is inside the cookie mix. 5. Repeat step 4 for each of the powders. 6. Place all five cookies into the oven; add an extra cookie without any powder added to it. ...read more.

Middle

Cinnamon mainly consists of the carbohydrate that gives it its odor and taste called cinnamaldehyde the molecular formula is C9H8O. Given that the carbohydrate that is most abundant is smaller than the others I believe that it is the one to become hotter faster and therefore making its surroundings further apart from each other. Results: There are very few results because the experiment didn't required a second or third trial to find anomalous results. I think the only thing that could have gone wrong when measuring the results is incorrect reading from the ruler that could be done again if it went wrong; this meant that repetition of the main test wasn't required. Length of cookie /mm �0.5 mm Powder Before being baked After being baked Difference Coffee 56.0 62.0 6.0 Cereal 53.0 55.0 2.0 Sugar 57.0 64.0 7.0 Normal 59.0 64.0 5.0 Chocolate 46.0 49.0 3.0 Cinnamon 55.0 56.0 1.0 Controlled variables Possible Variation Amount of powder*/ cm3 5.0 �0.2 Mass of cookie mix/ grams 100.0 �8.0 ...read more.

Conclusion

The only controlled variable that was possible to kept very constant was the time the cookies were inside the oven. Evaluation: The results gotten might be incorrect because of several different reasons; not being able to correctly read of the results of a ruler or measuring a different length of the cookie to the one measured before baking the cookies. Another source of error may be not being able to keep the constant variables the same throughout the experiment. I believe that my method is clear to follow although it is quite extensive for just one trial of the experiment. The only thing that I think isn't clear in the method is the cookie mix I used, I believe it isn't very relevant because according to me the thing that is being tasted is how much does the molded mix change in size when it has a certain type of powder and not how it reacts to the type of cookie mix the powder has around it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

4 star(s)

Response to the question

Overall a good piece. The essay shows a good depth of research and some reasoning of the scientific reasons behind the results and in predictions. The lack of a well rounded evaluation and conclusion are the only thing hurting this ...

Read full review

Response to the question

Overall a good piece. The essay shows a good depth of research and some reasoning of the scientific reasons behind the results and in predictions. The lack of a well rounded evaluation and conclusion are the only thing hurting this piece of work.

Level of analysis

The introduction is good and the candidate makes a prediction about what is going to happen, although the scientific reasoning behind this is not explained very well and I'm not sure what scientific use this experiment shows. The candidate uses controls which shows a higher level of thinking. The research the candidate puts into the experiment and the way it is explained is very clear and to a high level of understanding. The evaluation and conclusion could be a lot more rounded and thought out by considering other improvements and things that may have gone wrong with the experiment

Quality of writing

The decimal places uses were consistent in the results which was good. Spelling and punctuation are fine with minor grammatical errors in places which makes the writing slightly harder to read but this does not detract from the meaning of the piece.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by skatealexia 05/07/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Rates of Reaction

    5 star(s)

    These are: 1) Temperature increases the number of collisions When the temperature is increased the particles all move quicker. If they're moving quicker, they're going to have more collisions. Temperature: in a cold reaction mixture the particles are moving quite slowly. This means that the particles will collide with each other less often,

  2. Rates of Reaction - The Iodine Clock

    H2O 177 175 173 171 169 167 Na2S2O3 5 5 5 5 5 5 KI 2 4 6 8 10 12 H2O2 5 5 5 5 5 5 H2SO4 10 10 10 10 10 10 Starch 1 1 1 1 1 1 Time (seconds)

  1. Investigation into the digestion of milk by Trypsin.

    Method: Temperature - 2cm^3 of 1% trypsin solution should be measured out in a measuring cylinder. This should then be stood upright in a water bath that is set at 40 degrees Celsius. A further 5cm^3 of 4% milk solution should be measured out into a measuring cylinder and poured into a different test tube.

  2. Rates of Reaction- Hydrolysis of Urea by Urease

    The reaction was timed as soon as the urease was dispersed onto the urea solution; as the reaction between urease and urea occurred instantaneously. The timing was ceased in reference to the control test tube, and the results were recorded.

  1. The aim of the investigation is to examine the kinetics involved in the reactions ...

    The HCl loses its protons readily; therefore a high concentration of H+ ions is produced when the reaction reaches its homogenous equilibrium. The dissociation constants in the reaction is equivalent to the equilibrium constant Kc However, the difference between Kc and Ka is that Ka is not influenced by changes

  2. Null hypothesis:The type of sugar will have no effect on the rate of respiration ...

    Monosaccharides are divides in to three groups depending on their carbon atom as follows Triose - 3C Pentose - 5C Hexose - 6C The human body uses monosaccharides for two man reasons, Firstly they are used to produce energy by breaking the many hydrogen bonds present to produce ATP.

  1. RATE OF REACTION

    are left in longer than others then osmosis will have had a longer time in which to occur, depending on the concentration of the solutions that the samples were left in. This may mean that the amount of water entering or leaving the cells will be greater than of the other samples.

  2. Physical and Chemical Properties/Changes of several household chemicals

    b.) The mixture was filtered as shown in class. A piece of filter paper was folded in quarters. The paper was then opened to form a cone with one thickness of paper on one side and three thicknesses on the other. The filter paper was placed in a glass funnel and the funnel was then placed in a ring support attached to a ring stand.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work