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How does the length affect the amount of current flowing through a piece of wire?

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Introduction

How does the length affect the amount of current flowing through a piece of wire? Aim: To see how the length of a piece of wire affects the current flowing through the wire. Prediction: I predict that the longer the wire the least amount of current flowing through the wire. So if the length increases then the resistance will also increase in proportion to the length and the current will decrease. I think this because the longer the wire the more atoms and so the more likely the electrons are going to collide with the atoms. Scientific knowledge: As a result of the structure of all conductive atoms, the outer electrons are able to move about freely even in a solid. When there is a potential difference across a conductive material all of the free electrons arrange themselves in lines moving in the same direction. This forms an electrical current. Resistance is encountered when the charged particles that make up the current collide with other fixed particles in the material. As the resistance of a material increases so too must the force required to drive the same amount of current. In fact resistance, in ohms(R) is equal to the electromotive force or potential difference, in volts (V) divided by the current, in amperes (I) - Ohm's law. ...read more.

Middle

Switch off the power and let it cool down. (Change the length of the resistance wire to 40cm, reset the voltage to 2 volts and record the results. Switch off the power and let it cool down. (Change the length of the resistance wire to 30cm, reset the voltage to 2 volts and record the results. Switch off the power and let it cool down. (Change the length of the resistance wire to 20cm, reset the voltage to 2 volts and record the results. Switch off the power and let it cool down. (Change the length of the resistance wire to 10cm, reset the voltage to 2 volts and record the results. Switch off the power and let it cool down. (Use a voltmeter to measure voltage. (Use an ammeter to measure current. (Use a ruler to measure the wire. Voltage Length of resistance wire Current 2 100 0.18 2 90 0.20 2 80 0.23 2 70 0.26 2 60 0.31 2 50 0.38 2 40 0.49 2 30 0.66 2 20 0.95 2 10 2.04 Results: Voltage Length of resistance wire Current 2 100 0.18 2 90 0.21 2 80 0.26 2 70 0.28 2 60 0.32 2 50 0.38 2 40 0.49 2 30 0.66 2 20 0.95 2 10 2.02 Analysis: I conclude that the longer the wire, the least current and the higher the resistance. ...read more.

Conclusion

Secondly, the wire was not perfectly straight - it had several slight twists and bends in it, and this would have affected the accuracy of my results. The only way I would be able to solve the problem of the bends and twists in the wire is to use a brand new piece of wire and look after it very carefully. I could solve the length problem by using a brand new piece of wire, which starts off at 1m in length, and I would cut it down to size for each result. This would make our observations closer to the exact length. I had one anomalous result; it could have been because the temperature became too high, creating an extra variable to make the test unfair. If the temperature did get too high it would have increased the resistance and decreased the current. Similar to this idea, the wire could have had some impurities in it, varying the resistivity and increasing/decreasing the resistance. Any of the remaining three this because I have already used one in this experiment I chose length, factors affecting resistance could have been varied - temperature, resistivity and thickness, leading to unreliable readings. The other reason for an anomaly could simply be that we misread the voltmeter/ammeter. To improve this experiment I could use an even wider range of results to increase the reliability of my results, or I could repeat the results more times. Rebecca Day 10.1 ...read more.

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