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Investigation into an Enzyme Reaction between Catalase and Hydrogen Peroxide.

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Introduction

Investigation into an Enzyme Reaction between Catalase and Hydrogen Peroxide Catalase is an enzyme found in all living cells, such as yeast. Hydrogen peroxide is the substrate which catalase breaks down. There are 3 methods in which I can collect my results. I will need to analyse these before I begin my investigation. One way of collecting my results is the counting bubbles method, as shown below. This method is quite inaccurate, as the bubbles will differ in size. For example, a small bubble will mean the investigation is only giving off a little bit of oxygen, but a big bubble will mean it is giving off a lot more. If I was just counting bubbles, I am unlikely to take this into consideration, therefore giving an inaccurate result. The bubbles may also be given off rapidly, making it impossible to count. The second method is using a measuring cylinder in water to collect the bubbles given off. The oxygen that is released will push the water out of the cylinder, allowing me to record how much oxygen has been given off in a proper number, for example 20cm3. This method is shown below. This method is more reliable as I can record a proper result, rather than a number of bubbles. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore, the higher the concentration of substrate in the reaction, the faster the rate of the reaction will be. Apparatus 1 x test tube 2 x syringes (one for measuring the yeast solution, one for the hydrogen peroxide) 2 x beakers (one for the yeast solution, one for the hydrogen peroxide) 1 x clamp 1 x gas syringe 1 x stop clock 1 x trap (with bungs and delivery tubes) 1 x test tube rack Yeast solution Hydrogen peroxide Method Set up the apparatus as shown in the diagram. Measure out 2cm cubed of yeast solution into the test tube and the desired amount of hydrogen peroxide, and quickly bung it. Start the stop clock, and after 15 seconds, record the amount of oxygen that has been released, as shown on the gas syringe, into the table. Repeat the recordings after 30 seconds, 45 seconds and one minute also. To check my method works and produces accurate results, I am going to do a pilot test, using the method stated. If my method is simple and produces accurate results, I will continue with the investigation. If not, I will alter my method and pilot test again until I am satisfied with my method and results. Pilot Test Results Amount of Yeast Amount of Hydrogen Peroxide Oxygen Released in 15 seconds (cm3) ...read more.

Conclusion

I think as my results all follow the same pattern, except the one curve, my results are accurate and reliable. I am not sure why this anomaly has occurred, but I think to improve my investigation, I could use more frequent concentration changes such as 2cm3 of hydrogen peroxide, 2.2cm3 of hydrogen peroxide, 2.4cm3 of hydrogen peroxide and so on. This would make the results a lot more reliable, and it would probably be easier to see a reason behind my anomalies as well. My results fit my prediction, as the steeper the line, the faster the reaction is reacting, so as the lines get steeper as the concentration gets larger, the rate of reaction is getting faster as the concentration increases, so my prediction is correct. Evaluation If I was to repeat my investigation, I would take more accurate readings by using more frequent hydrogen peroxide concentration measurements as explained above. Also, using a bigger range of values, e.g. from 0.2cm3 of hydrogen peroxide and measuring every 0.2cm3 up to a higher value e.g. 20cm3 would give me a larger range of measurements to work with, and would ensure more accurate and reliable results. I think my method was reliable as my results, despite the one anomaly, supported my prediction, which was accurate due to my scientific knowledge of the collision theory. Conclusion The higher the concentration in a reaction, the faster the reaction rate. Biology Coursework Page 1 of 7 Vickie Cannam 11C ...read more.

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