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The aim of the experiment is to find out which of the different shapes/sized parachutes work most efficiently.

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Introduction

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Aim: The aim of the experiment is to find out which of the different shapes/sized parachutes work most efficiently.

Prediction: My prediction is that the parachute with the largest area will be the most efficient. I think this will happen as the larger area will grab the most air resistance making it last longer in the air and safer to use.

Apparatus part1:

Piece of thin card in the shape of a circle (approx. diameter 30cm)

Polythene Sheet

Sellotape

Cotton Thread

Paperclips

Ruler

Stop clock

Scissors

Apparatus part2: How to make the parachute?

  1. Place the card circle over the sheet of polythene and carefully cut round it. You now have a polythene circle.
  2. Cut 7 or 8 pieces of cotton thread, each about 40cm long. Take care to keep them separate.
  3. Use Sellotape to stick the threads around the polythene circle. (Don’t tangle them)
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Middle

Now repeat the above now with 4 paperclips.Add more paperclips, recording your results each time.Do you think that changing the size of the parachute will change the time taken to fall? Test your ideas.

Results:

These are the results for the first parachute:

Test Number

Time Taken to hit floor in secs

1

1.63

2

1.67

3

1.42

4

1.98

5

1.79

6

1.93

7

1.41

8

1.35

9

0.87

10

1.27

The average time is about 1.605 seconds.

Below are the results in the form of a line graph.

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Conclusion

    I must say that these results I obtained from someone else, but I fell I should also say that these results to me seem flawed as they are to scattered and to me I feel that either the parachutes weren’t made properly or that the people who record the results didn’t record them properly, but these results did prove my theory and I am happy about that.    

    This experiment to me should have been differently if not my way then an efficient and more reliable way.

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...read more.

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