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The effects of shade from trees on plants below

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Introduction

The Effect Of Shade From Trees (On plants below) The effects of shade from trees on plants below Introduction A collection of living things together at the same place and time is called a Habitat. The main purpose of a habitat is to provide and adequate food supply, a comfortable place to breeding/reproduction to take place and to provide a certain degree of shelter. Examples of various habitats are: * Forests and woodland/ trees * Bushes and shrubs * Ponds/ lakes * Sand dunes * Grassland * Rocky shores * Mossy brick walls Apart from where the habitat is situated, there are also 5 other key factors that affect the living things in a habitat. These are: 1. Climate: which includes variation in Temperature, the amount of rainfall, the light intensity and wind variation. 2. Biotic: Interaction of living things e.g. food chains/ webs 3. Humans: pollution and insecticides are used which effect the environment. 4. Soil: Variations in soil type lead to certain living things having to live in certain areas 5. Shape of the land and aspect: certain areas of land would not be suitable for all living things because of various obstacles. A woodland habitat Within a woodland habitat the main dominating organisms are the trees. ...read more.

Middle

* Tape * Two pegs * Identification sheet * Metre rules * Light metres * Temperature probe * PH Kit I will firstly start off by choosing the area in which I will be carrying out my investigation, then I will reel out the tape and then use the two pegs to fasten the tape at both ends. One end of the tape will be under some trees in the woodland, the other end of the tape will be fastened in bareground. Then I will place the quadrat along the edge of the tape and take various readings. The readings that I will be taking are: * Amount of area a specific plant takes up. * The amount of bareground there is. * The hight of the tallest plant * The greenness of its leaf * Size of its broadest leaf * Temparature * Intensity of light * PH of soil Although the Belt transect method is an effective way of taking a fairly accurate results, overlapping may occur, leading to the results being less accurate. I will have to ensure this does not happen by marking where each quadrat is placed. Once I have gathered the results required from the testing I may then repeat the procedure and then work out the average results. ...read more.

Conclusion

I found identifying some of the plants fairly difficult, and would prefer it if I had a clear description and photograph of the plants before beginning the experiment. Improving the accuracy of identifying the plants could improve the accuracy of the results. Trampling of the plants was also an issue when it came to estimating how much room specific plants took up. If a plant were trampled then it would give an inaccurate reading. Although the trampling of some of the plants was unavoidable due to the position of the quadrat and other pieces of equipment. Another problem was the overlapping of some of the plants, this made the task of estimating how much room a specific plant took up even more difficult and could lead to inaccurate results. When looking at the graphs produced based on my results, it was clear to see that there were some anomalous results. These were possibly produced by a number reasons. One of these reasons could have been that the canopy was not as dense in some parts of the woodland as it was in others. Although there were some anomalous results the general trend could still be seen. As further work, or possibly to check accuracy, it might be a good idea to perform the experiment in other parts of the woodland, this could then determine whether or not similar results could be found elsewhere. Science Coursework Tony Capon 10E Biology ...read more.

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A detailed account showing a good understanding of difficulties associated with this kind of study.

Marked by teacher Adam Roberts 05/07/2013

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