• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is the effect of mass on friction?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Mikhael                                                                             2nd GCSE

Boukraa

Physics

COURSEWORK

What is the effect of mass on friction?

PLANNING:

        To conduct this experiment, certain materials will be required. These include the following: 2 force meters (one that measures forces up to 5 Newtons and one that measures forces up to 10 Newtons), a mass i.e. a block of wood of about 15cm3, a table or any smooth surface, a strip of slightly grainy sandpaper and another strip of more grainy sandpaper. The experiment will be set up as shown below (fig 1).

image00.pngFig 2

This experiment was set up into two sections, firstly the effect of mass on dynamic friction and then the effect of mass on static friction.

Dynamic Friction: For the dynamic friction experiment, the force of friction will be read off the force meter. This is due to Newton’s second law stating that Fnet = ma. When the block is being pulled along at constant speed, the acceleration is 0 so Fnet = 0. Therefore P = F and so the force shown on the force meter is equal to the frictional force.

A hook should first be placed into the block of wood so that it may be pulled along by the force meter. Then the block must be massed and its mass recorded (see table of results)

...read more.

Middle

3.6

3.6

4.3

4.0

4.25

4.2

7.59

1.9

1.8

1.9

1.9

4.1

4.3

4.5

4.3

4.75

4.75

4.8

4.8

8.59

2.2

2.15

2.2

2.2

4.9

4.75

4.6

4.8

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

9.59

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.3

5.5

5.6

5.5

5.6

6.1

6.5

6

6.2

STATIC FRICTION

Weight (N)

Force F on Tiles (N)

Force F on Grey Sandpaper (N)

Force F on Green Sandpaper (N)

P1

P2

P3

Pav

P1

...read more.

Conclusion

        Further experiments could be undertaken such as studying friction of an object on a slope. A wooden block will be placed onto a board. The block is massed beforehand. One end of the board will be raised slowly. As the slope increases, the block will not move until a certain angle is reached. When this angle is reached, the block will slide down the slope. This angle will then be recorded using a protractor. A mass will then be added to the block (the mass should be taped down to the block to prevent it from sliding off). The slope of the board will then be once more increased until the point where the block will slide off. Once again, the weight of the block + mass should be recorded in the table with the angle of the slope. This procedure will then be repeated using 6 more masses. A graph may then be plotted to demonstrate any relationship between the weight of the object and the slope at which it began to move. The graph plotted could be the angle of the slope at which the block moved over the weight of the block.  Any extra tests will only increase the reliability of the Hypothesis.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Friction Between two surfaces

    3 star(s)

    Force When Moving At A Constant Speed (N) 1st 5 1st 4 1 Book 2nd 5 2nd 4 3rd 4 3rd 4 1st 8 1st 6 2 Books 2nd 9 2nd 7 3rd 8 3rd 6 1st 10 1st 9 3 Books 2nd 10 2nd 8 3rd 10 3rd 9

  2. The effect of the temperature on the viscosity of the syrup.

    To eliminate this fault in future, the sphere should be kept on a clamp and released from it. This would ensure that the sphere has a constant initial velocity throughout the experiment. Moreover it will ensure that the sphere is descending from the same position each time.

  1. How does the weight of an object affect the friction it has on the ...

    a piece of string, which will in turn be attached to a force meter. The block will then be pulled along a clean horizontal surface, with the smaller surface area of the block of wood in contact with the chosen surface.

  2. Investigation into the effect of temperature on viscosity

    The co-efficient of viscosity decreases with increasing temperature, this is due to bonds in the molecules of the honey (or any liquid). The bonds in question are temporary intermolecular bonds created by the instantaneous imbalance of electrons in a molecule.

  1. Investigating Sliding Friction: the effect of weight on sliding friction between a block and ...

    Equipment > Foam surface > Wooden block > Newton meter > Nine 100gram weights > Flat surface that will stay continuously at the same angle Diagram Method 1)

  2. Mechanics 2 Coursework - 'woosh' down the slide

    D/ vcos? + 1/2 g D2 / v2cos2? --> H = D tan? + g D2 / (2 cos2?(2gL(sin? - tan?cos?))) --> H = D tan? + D2 / (4 cos2?L(sin?

  1. Investigation into Friction.

    F R � is the coefficient of static friction, meaning that F ? R From this formula, we can state that the higher the force of friction between the surfaces, the greater ? is. F and R are directly proportional to one another, meaning that ?

  2. Mechanical Properties of a Meter Rule

    I set up the experiment which is shown under the heading 'rough trials apparatus 2'. I first put a rule on the side of a table. This was used to measure the distance the swinging rule was held out at, (0.2 meters).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work