• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the Anti-Oriental movements influence?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the Anti-Oriental movements influence? Submitted by: Bridget Belsher Class: Social 10H Date: January 12, 2007 Submitted to: Ms Ponce A. Plan of the Investigation To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the anti-oriental movement's influence? This investigation seeks to evaluate the influence anti-oriental influence had on the Canadian government. This investigation will establish the origins of anti oriental sentiment in Canada, will examine laws passed in order to limit East Indians job opportunities and will use the Komagata Maru as the primary example. Two sources used in this paper, The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: the Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar and White Canada Forever: Popular Attitudes and Public Policy towards Orientals in British Columbia will be evaluated will define their origins, purpose value and limitations. An analysis will indicate how anti-oriental sentiment was responsible for the enactment of laws that deprived East Indians of some of their basic human rights, on the basis of race. B. Summary of Evidence 1. Komagata Maru Incident In May 1914, the 357 passengers aboard the charter ship Komagata Maru, left their last stop en route to Canada. The passengers were composed mostly of East Indians, all whom wanted to be able to send back money from Canada to help their impoverished families. ...read more.

Middle

The value of this book is that it talks about the Sikhs, Japanese and Chinese and what they had to go through because of their ethnic origin, religion etc. The east Indians were like the Chinese and the Japanese were protested against, and those who protested against them to prevent from having East Indians immigrant thought they were doing it out of kindness. This book was excellent as a reference due to the well organized content throughout the book The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: the Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar, written by Hugh Johnston published in 1989. The purpose of this book is that the author is taking many small stories that are related and connecting them into one large story. The value of this book is evident as this event which east Indians challenged white supremacy for the first time was documented. You look at its limitation; a limitation of this book is that if you just wanted the basic facts, this would not be a good source. However, this book would be recommended if you wanted depth knowledge about the Komagata Maru then this book would be a good source. D. Analysis The origins of the racial attitudes that resulted in the passing of the continuous passage law are long and twisted. Before 1800, people of oriental origin were respected, to a point, because their countries had made major contributions to the evolution of technology. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some might say that whites were right in F. List of Sources Boyko, John "Last Steps to Freedom: The Evolution of Canadian Racism" (2nd edition revised Manitoba: J. Gordon Shillingford Publishing Co. 1998) Johnston, Hugh "The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: The Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar" (2nd edition, Vancouver: University of British Columbia press, 1989) Johnston, Hugh "The East Indians in Canada," (Ottawa: Canadian Historical Association, 1984) Singh, Kesar "Canadian Sikhs (part one) and the Komagata Maru Massacre" (Vancouver: publisher Kesar Singh 1989) Singh, Narindar "Canadian Sikhs: History, Religion and Culture of Sikhs in North America" (Nepean: Canadian Sikh Studies Institute 1994) Singh, Saint Nihal, and J. Barclay Williams "Canada's New Immigrant: The Hindu" Canadian magazine, 28, 4(1907), pp. 383-91 Singh Saint N. "The Sikhs in Canada or Grievances of East Indians" the Canadian magazine Toronto: 30 (November 1907) pp.57-60 Smith, Ralph E. "The Sikhs" Canadian Magazine volume 38 (1911) Thompson, John Herd. "Ethnic Minorities During Two World Wars" (Ottawa: Canada Historical Association, 1991) Ward, W. Peter "White Canada Forever: Popular Attitudes and Public Policy Towards Orientals in British Columbia" (2nd edition, Toronto, McGill-Queens University Press, 1990) 1 Hugh Johnston. The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: The Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar (Vancouver, 1989), p. 39. 2 Narindar Singh. Canadian Sikhs: History, Religon and Culture of Sikhs in North America(Ottawa, 1994) , p. 34. 3 Ibid, p. 33. 4 W. Peter Ward. White Canada Forever: popular attitudes and public policy towards Orientals in British Columbia.(Kingston 1990), p.4 5 Ibid, p.28. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Egyptian Influence Extended Essay

    more comfortable, letting them move easier and giving them a nice breeze, which made a great deal of importance because they live in a desert.

  2. The influence of socialism on the development of universal human rights

    Another important event for the development of human rights was the Civil War in the United States between the Northern and the Southern part between 1861 and 1865. Northern part was politically progressive and more industrial, whereas the Southern part was politically conservative and heavily depended on agriculture and slavery.

  1. To what extent and in what ways did Elvis influence American pop culture?

    His musical style was hit with teenagers especially, with throngs of them coming to each one of his concerts. Elvis also influenced the pop culture by bringing a sexual element to music and performance that many prior musicians refrained from exhibiting.

  2. The North, The South, and Slavery

    First generation settlers (1850s) arrived with modest resources and struggled for many years to develop a plantation on what was a rugged frontier, and only recently been able to live in comfort iii. Large areas of Old South had been cultivated for less than 2 decades at Civil War iv.

  1. The Effects of the Great Depression on Canada.

    Yet Federal Reserve board felt otherwise, because it was based more and more on the shaky business of borrowed money. Soon later, investors began to sell, and as it fell, people holding the stocks started to worry. Margin swept the market, and as the drop value of their stock fell more than their down payment, their down payment depreciated.

  2. WW2 notes on the causes and the involvement of Canada.

    He continued to try to overthrow the Republican government in 1936. Events: At first, other countries were not involved. But soon, Germany and Italy sided with Franco. Canadians were still following isolationism, but some did continue to join Canada's battalion, Mackenzie-Papineau Mackenzie-Papineau: Named after the two leaders who fought for responsible government in Canadian rebellions in 1837.

  1. Has Canada always been fair when it comes to immigration?

    So, when WW1 erupted after the shooting of Franz Ferdinand (Bolotta- 37), German, Italian and Austria- Hungarian immigrants in Canada faced discrimination. This act was extremely unfair, as the government had no right to accuse immigrants because their country of birth was associated with war. Furthermore, no proof was evident.

  2. The Great Revolt (Indian Mutiny) of 1857 came as a surprise to the British, ...

    The discrimination in salary too created enmity. ?A sawar in the cavalry was given Rs. 27 out of which he had to pay for him own uniform, food and upkeep of his mount, and he was ultimately left with only a rupee or two.? As hard as the Indian sepoys

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work