• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the Anti-Oriental movements influence?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the Anti-Oriental movements influence? Submitted by: Bridget Belsher Class: Social 10H Date: January 12, 2007 Submitted to: Ms Ponce A. Plan of the Investigation To what extent were East Indians living in or immigrating to Canada impacted by the anti-oriental movement's influence? This investigation seeks to evaluate the influence anti-oriental influence had on the Canadian government. This investigation will establish the origins of anti oriental sentiment in Canada, will examine laws passed in order to limit East Indians job opportunities and will use the Komagata Maru as the primary example. Two sources used in this paper, The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: the Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar and White Canada Forever: Popular Attitudes and Public Policy towards Orientals in British Columbia will be evaluated will define their origins, purpose value and limitations. An analysis will indicate how anti-oriental sentiment was responsible for the enactment of laws that deprived East Indians of some of their basic human rights, on the basis of race. B. Summary of Evidence 1. Komagata Maru Incident In May 1914, the 357 passengers aboard the charter ship Komagata Maru, left their last stop en route to Canada. The passengers were composed mostly of East Indians, all whom wanted to be able to send back money from Canada to help their impoverished families. ...read more.

Middle

The value of this book is that it talks about the Sikhs, Japanese and Chinese and what they had to go through because of their ethnic origin, religion etc. The east Indians were like the Chinese and the Japanese were protested against, and those who protested against them to prevent from having East Indians immigrant thought they were doing it out of kindness. This book was excellent as a reference due to the well organized content throughout the book The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: the Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar, written by Hugh Johnston published in 1989. The purpose of this book is that the author is taking many small stories that are related and connecting them into one large story. The value of this book is evident as this event which east Indians challenged white supremacy for the first time was documented. You look at its limitation; a limitation of this book is that if you just wanted the basic facts, this would not be a good source. However, this book would be recommended if you wanted depth knowledge about the Komagata Maru then this book would be a good source. D. Analysis The origins of the racial attitudes that resulted in the passing of the continuous passage law are long and twisted. Before 1800, people of oriental origin were respected, to a point, because their countries had made major contributions to the evolution of technology. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some might say that whites were right in F. List of Sources Boyko, John "Last Steps to Freedom: The Evolution of Canadian Racism" (2nd edition revised Manitoba: J. Gordon Shillingford Publishing Co. 1998) Johnston, Hugh "The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: The Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar" (2nd edition, Vancouver: University of British Columbia press, 1989) Johnston, Hugh "The East Indians in Canada," (Ottawa: Canadian Historical Association, 1984) Singh, Kesar "Canadian Sikhs (part one) and the Komagata Maru Massacre" (Vancouver: publisher Kesar Singh 1989) Singh, Narindar "Canadian Sikhs: History, Religion and Culture of Sikhs in North America" (Nepean: Canadian Sikh Studies Institute 1994) Singh, Saint Nihal, and J. Barclay Williams "Canada's New Immigrant: The Hindu" Canadian magazine, 28, 4(1907), pp. 383-91 Singh Saint N. "The Sikhs in Canada or Grievances of East Indians" the Canadian magazine Toronto: 30 (November 1907) pp.57-60 Smith, Ralph E. "The Sikhs" Canadian Magazine volume 38 (1911) Thompson, John Herd. "Ethnic Minorities During Two World Wars" (Ottawa: Canada Historical Association, 1991) Ward, W. Peter "White Canada Forever: Popular Attitudes and Public Policy Towards Orientals in British Columbia" (2nd edition, Toronto, McGill-Queens University Press, 1990) 1 Hugh Johnston. The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: The Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar (Vancouver, 1989), p. 39. 2 Narindar Singh. Canadian Sikhs: History, Religon and Culture of Sikhs in North America(Ottawa, 1994) , p. 34. 3 Ibid, p. 33. 4 W. Peter Ward. White Canada Forever: popular attitudes and public policy towards Orientals in British Columbia.(Kingston 1990), p.4 5 Ibid, p.28. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Egyptian Influence Extended Essay

    The rings are pretty much the same, they had three types: a steatite gold ring that had a scarab, a steatite gold ring with no scarab, or a plain silver ring. To adorn the body, they would use wooden combs, hairpins, tweezers, shavers, and perfume.

  2. The Great Revolt (Indian Mutiny) of 1857 came as a surprise to the British, ...

    In the province of Oudh, most families had at least one member in the army. So when the British annexed the land under the Doctrine of Lapse the sepoys were angered as their families were suffering. A more immediate cause would be the introduction of the new Enfield rifles.

  1. Aboriginal Human Rights and Canadian History

    As the First Nations moved onto reserves, losing lands and resources, they were also in danger of losing their identities. The danger of losing their identities was heightened by the Canadian government?s policy of assimilation ? a process meant to absorb one people into the culture of another.

  2. WW2 notes on the causes and the involvement of Canada.

    Canadian Involvement Around the World Hong Kong Canadians first engagement of WWII. Japan took over the British colony of Hong Kong after the attack on Pearl Harbour Canada was a part of the few troops that were sent to protect Hong Kong.

  1. Has Canada always been fair when it comes to immigration?

    Furthermore, no proof was evident. Canada abolished the immigrant?s freedom, which before acted as a pull factor encouraging people to immigrate to Canada. ?Enemy aliens? were forbidden to work, pursue their culture or simply speak in their native language (Mapleleaf Web). Many ?enemy aliens? were deported back to their mother country, for they simply looked guilty.

  2. An Ethnic History of Canada.

    1791: Lower Canada (Quebec) and Upper Canada (Ontario) are formed. Lower Canada consists mostly of French speaking Catholics, while Upper Canada is dominated by English speaking Protestants. 1837: Rebellions result in Lower Canada after the war of 1812 due to French Canadian nationalism.

  1. The Westeinde is one of the higher parts of The Hague, and the story ...

    bright and liveable as we could, without, however, entirely succeeding in divesting the passage itself of a depressing gloominess for which it was difficult to account. Vague stories were indeed current of the building being haunted, and the occupants of one room in particular were certainly plagued by vivid nightmares

  2. The Effects of the Great Depression on Canada.

    shoes, as to those students who stayed; were forced to wear worn out stitched clothes and at times became too embarrassing to go to school.. Weather: Another factor was the severe drought and other economic difficulties, which ruined the economy of the prairie region.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work