• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Neuroplasticity is the brains ability to change and lay down new neuron pathways as individuals are exposed to new environments

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Neuroplasticity is the brain?s ability to change and lay down new neuron pathways as individuals are exposed to new environments, stimulation, and experiences. It rewires and reconstructs itself for maximum functionality, adding processes of learning and memory to permanent skills and abilities. In medical applications, it is the key factor to recover through surgery removals and injuries in the central nervous system. The concept of neuroplasticity is fairly new in the world of neuroscience research. However, they are many implications that two major factors report activating the rewiring of the brain; stimulation and experience. Rosenzweig & Benson (1972) reported that enriched environment or rather natural environment have a major influence in the fundamental process of neuroplasticity and increase the complexity of the brain?s circuitry. They began by gathering three male rats and at random assigned them to particular cages of different environments. The first cage was standard, occupying other rats and having adequate supply of food and water. The second cage was described to be impoverished, with no other rat occupants and adequate water. The third cage was what Rosenzweig referred to as the enriched environment that had a variety of toys for the rats to play with. ...read more.

Middle

According to the study conducted by University College London; Maguire (2000), long term experience of spatial jobs, particularly taxi drivers, have more grey matter in the posterior hippocampus compared to non-taxi drivers from days of memorizing maps and the city?s geography to stimulate the growth of extra grey matter in the posterior hippocampus that deals with produce more neural circuitry in that specific region of the brain. One can conclude that the more exposure to that skill or experience, the more plastic the brain will be in creating new neuron pathways and developing itself. Other evidence prove similar results, Pascal-Leone (2002) reported that after instructing participants to practice a five-finger piano exercise for five days, their motor cortex had expanded, even more if they decided to practice outside of training sessions. These results suggest that training and imagination can alter brain physiology. One other example refers to Richard Held (1960) who ran a series of experiment testing sensory inputs and motor outputs. One group of participants were asked to stroll on a convoluted pathway while wearing goggles that warped their vision. ...read more.

Conclusion

Stress can also affect the way humans deposit fats in their body. Research done by White Hall Study (1985) observed that chronic stress in humans could alter the way they gain weight. It is dangerous because fat carried in the midsection or abdomen is much worst than anywhere else in the body. In addition, stress increase blood cholesterol levels through the action of adrenaline on the release of fatty acids. These cholesterol particles will clump together and block pathways in artery walls that may result to atherosclerosis and further death if not stopped. A study by Epel et al., (2004) investigated that fragile telomeres were a result to chronic stress. Telomeres act as a protective cover for chromosomes for proper replication. As more stress hormones are released, the more consequence it has on physiology. Environment has a profound affect on physiology that shapes our brains and body everyday. Stimulations and experiences that deal with learning enhances neuroplasticity and provoke a heavier more complex cerebral cortex, while common exposure to chronic stress provoke negative consequences of physiology. Thus with research, one can ascertained that the experience we face daily affect our body and mind, whether positively or negatively. The brain is an evolutionary organ that alters its structure according to your experiences. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Psychology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Psychology essays

  1. An experiment investigating the effect of background music on students ability to recall a ...

    The participants were divided into two groups, one of which as the control with no music; and the other with music being played at both recall and memorization. Factors such as the time they were shown the word lists and the amount of time to write things down were controlled in order to make results more accurate.

  2. The Basic Mechanisms of Homeostasis Overview of homeostasis The term homeostasis was ...

    Lazarsfeld et al. (1945) initially assumed that messages were transmitted from the mass media to a 'mass audience', who absorb the message . However, their work suggests that only 5% of people change their voting behaviour as a result of media messages.

  1. This experiment investigated the effect of the presence of others on the number of ...

    A renowned study on social facilitation was conducted by Floyd Allport in 1920. Participants were asked to perform a variety of tasks under two different conditions. Some subjects had to work on the task while sitting around a table, isolated from the rest of the participants.

  2. Env. explanations of learning

    The experiment was also only conducted on one boy, and whether or not he could have truly represented the general public is questionable. For example a boy who has been brought up in a different background with lots of construction work outside his building may have been observed to be

  1. Is eyewitness testimony reliable?

    in the cases of accidents and crimes increases, and therefore the guilty do not come to justice (Gross, 64). Many experiments conclude that law professionals and judges rely and place their decisions on eyewitness testimony, however, researchers investigated on situations whereby the innocent had been accused.

  2. To What Extent Can Music Improve a Child's Intelligence?

    because of the Mozart effect. The ?Mozart Effect? seemed too good to be true and indeed, when researchers replicated the study, they found that it was; it turned out that intelligence scores did not vary as much as the ?Mozart effect? had predicted (Stough, Kerkin, Bates & Mangan, 1994).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work