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Emily Dickinson commentary. The short poem written by Emily Dickinson is open to several interpretations. It makes references to the sea with key words such as ships, seas, sailors and Wharfs.

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Introduction

The short poem written by Emily Dickinson is open to several interpretations. It makes references to the sea with key words such as ships, seas, sailors and Wharfs. However, others might argue the poem talks about gardens. Some might even argue the poem is about a sunset. Emily Dickinson uses metaphors and imagery to allow for various interpretations of the poem. At first glance, the poem appears to be talking about the sea. This is apparent because the poet uses words such as ships, seas, sailors, and Wharf. However, Dickinson places these words in such a context that it is obvious the poem is not a simple reference to the sea. ...read more.

Middle

However, the ships of purple could also refer to purple flowers in a garden. From the beginning, the poem allows for various interpretations of the same sentence. The next line is "Gently toss". The poet used this line because it can have a variety of meanings. Some might picture a ship being gently tossed by the waves. However this can be a metaphor for clouds moving across the sky. Another interpretation of this line would be this line is a metaphor for flowers being blown by the wind. The next line is "On seas of Daffodil". For the first time in the poem, the poet makes a direct reference to flowers, the Daffodil. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poem ends with "and then- the wharf is still." This could refer to the empty wharf after the sailors have ended their day and went home. This could also be a metaphor for the sun finally setting and the sky becoming dark. It is "still" because most activities stop after the sun has set. This could also be a metaphor for the flowers becoming still after the wind has passed by. Emily Dickinson makes excellent use of metaphors to allow for various interpretation of the poem. Some might view the poem as a ship sailing in the ocean and finally returning back to the wharf. Others might view it as the wind and bees passing along a peaceful garden. This poem can also be interpreted as a sunset. Dickinson uses metaphors and imagery to allow for these various interpretations. ...read more.

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