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In the Glass Menagerie, the main characters in the play seem as if they are living their worlds vicariously. Each seems to try and avoid reality and try to flee from actuality in their lives.

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Introduction

Literary Analysis for the Glass Menagerie In the Glass Menagerie, the main characters in the play seem as if they are living their worlds vicariously. Each seems to try and avoid reality and try to flee from actuality in their lives. In doing so, each impinge on their peers lives, and in essence ruin and tear down their own lives. In the Glass Menagerie, Tom, Amanda, and Laura retreat to their own worlds to escape the harsh reality of life, which affects their own lives and the lives of their loved ones. In Tom's life, he is fed up with his life, including his job, his peers, and his family. He is constantly being harassed by his mother and feels like she is deliberately beleaguering him. Tom feels stressed and wants a new life of adventure and feels like he needs to escape and move on to higher things. ...read more.

Middle

It's you that makes me rush through meals with your hawk like attention to every bite I take. Sickening - spoils my appetite - all this discussion of- animals' secretion - salivary glands - mastication!"(Williams 10). In Amanda's life, she is trying to cling onto past memories in her life. This is apparent and reflected through her constant flashbacks which she persistently brings up to her children. She continuously tells her daughter, Laura, how many gentleman callers she has had when she was young. She lives in her own fantasy, like her children, with the memories of her life back when she was young living in Blue Mountain. Upon bringing these memories up, it affects the characters relationship with her because they are fed up with her stories. This is true with Tom who feels utterly irritated by Amanda's stories. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is unaccustomed to the outside world and this makes her even more prone to trusting only her glass menagerie. This is shown when Jim O'Connor visits the Wingfield apartment and Laura refuses to even open the door when he arrives. She is so scared of failure and unattached to reality that she rejects even making contact with another man. Laura's shyness affects the people around her such as Tom and Jim O'Connor because he knows Laura is frail and weak, which is their only perception of her. Together these characters show exactly what it means to live a life vicariously. They can't put up with the present and each one simultaneously rejects reality and tries to escape their real lives by living it out in a fantasy. Each of these characters has their own problems and tries to deal with them individually. Tom, Amanda, and Laura retreat to their own worlds to escape the harsh reality of life, which in retrospect affects their lives and the lives of everyone else around them. ...read more.

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