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Lucinda Roy, in her poem Points of View refers to different points of view of a modernised world and a non modernised world about the same subject of water.

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Introduction

Points of View Lucinda Roy, in her poem 'Points of View' refers to different points of view of a modernised world and a non modernised world about the same subject of water. These differences are highlighted by using a third person view point of women who travel long distances for water daily and having a contrasting first person point of view of the speaker who attains water with ease not knowing the importance of it. Roy uses the technique of points of view also to show her need to go back to the traditional way of life of the unmodernised world. In this poem the poet also makes an underlying reference to the supression of women. The tone of the poem changes as it flows from stanza to the next. It develops from an air of pity to the tone of a satisfied person. ...read more.

Middle

The word 'bend' is repeated twice in the first stanza. 'women bend to rivers,' (L1, stanza 1) and 'women bend to see themselves in rivers' (L7, stanza 1). This repetition shows that the poet wants to emphasis that women almost worship water by bending down to respect it. Throughout this poem water is depicted as an almost evil beast. The first indication to this in the first stanza is made when the poet mentions 'water sucks them in, catchting the wild geometry of the soul'. This shows that in the unmodernised part of the world's view point, water is an evil creature whilst in the modernised world according to the second stanza this beast is 'tamed from metal spouts encased' (L16, stanza 2) and the speaker can 'compartmentalize the beast in ice' (L18, stanza 2). ...read more.

Conclusion

Further evidence to this idea is given as she mentions that 'I will swim in rivers thick with time' (L21-22, stanza 2) The poet writes these lines in future tense which shows that she would wish to move back in time to rediscover her roots. The poet describes this journey that she wishes to take to her past as an 'intense immersion. A new baptism free of metaphor' (L31-32, stanza 2). This shows that reverting to her traditional life where she has to go and find water to be an 'intense immersion'. By using the word 'baptism', Roy suggests that it would be a new beginning for her. By using a combination of these techniques, the poet manages to give a message to the reader that is not to take everything for granted. Through this poem Roy also portrays the role of women in the society that she wants to take part of. English English ...read more.

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