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Through Oedipus the King, (430 B.C) by using foreshadowing, Sophocles successfully hints at the prophecys coming true as well

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Introduction

Quan Nguyen (863 not including header, title, and works cited) Professor Juncker English 1B 8 December 2010 Blindness "Oedipus the King" (430 B.C) is one of the most famous dramas of Sophocles, which is about Oedipus who is miserably fated to kill his father and get married with his mother when he grows up. The dreadful prophecy ends up coming true regardless of his and the parents' effort of staying away from the cruel and terrified destiny. Through "Oedipus the King," (430 B.C) by using foreshadowing, Sophocles successfully hints at the prophecy's coming true as well as Oedipus's blinding himself, which are two main important points throughout the whole play; thus, a significant view is underscored as well which is fate is inescapable no matter how hard people try to avoid it. First, Sophocles uses foreshadowing to convey that the prophecy about Oedipus's fate will come true no matter what happens. Through Tiresias' mysterious words which anger Oedipus, Sophocles skillfully implies that the prophecy ends up coming true regardless of Oedipus and his parents' effort of avoiding it. ...read more.

Middle

In addition, through the conversation between Oedipus and Jocasta, his wife as well as his mother also hints at Oedipus's revelation of the dreadful prophecy fulfillment. For instance, when Jocasta says, "The heralds no sooner reported Laius dead than you appeared and they hailed you king of Thebes;" (812-813) plus, when Oedipus keeps asking. "Laius - how did he look? Describe him" (816) and she answers, "[...] his build... wasn't far from yours," (818) they are foreshadowing for the fact that Laius is Oedipus's father and he is also the one Oedipus has killed. All in all, by using the blind prophet's strong comment and foreshadowing from Oedipus and Jocatta's conversation about Laius, Sophocles hints to readers that the prophecy already comes true before the main characters realize it themselves. Second, foreshadowing is used again to underscore an upcoming action of Oedipus which is his blinding himself when the whole truth is revealed. ...read more.

Conclusion

understanding of his fate, less inner vision, and less humility than he is beginning to achieve after he loses that flooding, outer light." Similarly, according to Brian Sutton, he writes in his article "Sophocles's Oedipus the King and Spielberg's Minority Report," "This loss of eyes largely coincides with the protagonist's ability to "see" in a deeper sense." Likewise, for Oedipus's bright sight of his vision but blindness of his fate, Sophocles skillfully uses foreshadowing to convey the miserable ending of this drama which is Oedipus's blinding himself; thus, it can be considered as his way of bringing himself the clear sight after suffering from his blindness. Therefore, since he does not believe in the old man's revelation and strongly deny his statement, we can vaguely predict how hard he will hurt himself when he realizes that he has been blind for everything which has happened. Sophocles is successfully using foreshadowing to hints at the vital points of "Oedipus the King", which are the dreadful prophecy's coming true as well as Oedipus's blinding himself. ...read more.

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