• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Through Oedipus the King, (430 B.C) by using foreshadowing, Sophocles successfully hints at the prophecys coming true as well

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Quan Nguyen (863 not including header, title, and works cited) Professor Juncker English 1B 8 December 2010 Blindness "Oedipus the King" (430 B.C) is one of the most famous dramas of Sophocles, which is about Oedipus who is miserably fated to kill his father and get married with his mother when he grows up. The dreadful prophecy ends up coming true regardless of his and the parents' effort of staying away from the cruel and terrified destiny. Through "Oedipus the King," (430 B.C) by using foreshadowing, Sophocles successfully hints at the prophecy's coming true as well as Oedipus's blinding himself, which are two main important points throughout the whole play; thus, a significant view is underscored as well which is fate is inescapable no matter how hard people try to avoid it. First, Sophocles uses foreshadowing to convey that the prophecy about Oedipus's fate will come true no matter what happens. Through Tiresias' mysterious words which anger Oedipus, Sophocles skillfully implies that the prophecy ends up coming true regardless of Oedipus and his parents' effort of avoiding it. ...read more.

Middle

In addition, through the conversation between Oedipus and Jocasta, his wife as well as his mother also hints at Oedipus's revelation of the dreadful prophecy fulfillment. For instance, when Jocasta says, "The heralds no sooner reported Laius dead than you appeared and they hailed you king of Thebes;" (812-813) plus, when Oedipus keeps asking. "Laius - how did he look? Describe him" (816) and she answers, "[...] his build... wasn't far from yours," (818) they are foreshadowing for the fact that Laius is Oedipus's father and he is also the one Oedipus has killed. All in all, by using the blind prophet's strong comment and foreshadowing from Oedipus and Jocatta's conversation about Laius, Sophocles hints to readers that the prophecy already comes true before the main characters realize it themselves. Second, foreshadowing is used again to underscore an upcoming action of Oedipus which is his blinding himself when the whole truth is revealed. ...read more.

Conclusion

understanding of his fate, less inner vision, and less humility than he is beginning to achieve after he loses that flooding, outer light." Similarly, according to Brian Sutton, he writes in his article "Sophocles's Oedipus the King and Spielberg's Minority Report," "This loss of eyes largely coincides with the protagonist's ability to "see" in a deeper sense." Likewise, for Oedipus's bright sight of his vision but blindness of his fate, Sophocles skillfully uses foreshadowing to convey the miserable ending of this drama which is Oedipus's blinding himself; thus, it can be considered as his way of bringing himself the clear sight after suffering from his blindness. Therefore, since he does not believe in the old man's revelation and strongly deny his statement, we can vaguely predict how hard he will hurt himself when he realizes that he has been blind for everything which has happened. Sophocles is successfully using foreshadowing to hints at the vital points of "Oedipus the King", which are the dreadful prophecy's coming true as well as Oedipus's blinding himself. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate World Literature section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate World Literature essays

  1. 100 plus maketing plan

    When they motivate to any other brand or on 100+ it's in instinct basically that based on messages derive certain feelings. But F&N thinks in a different way, they believe that RC Cola, new coming AMRAT Cola, and all juices, even they take water as their competitors.

  2. A detailed study of 'Oedipus Rex'

    (Sophocles 81) This quote from the end of the book is a speech given by Choragos.

  1. Oedipus Rex Study Question Answers

    Oedipus's self-blinding can be seen from various angles. It seems to be a punishment of what is evil, for Oedipus does not deign to call himself unlucky, ill-starred, but just evil or vile. But the blinding serves one more purpose.

  2. Issue of Fate Vs. Free Will In Oedipus the King

    The environment had the most significant effect on Oedipus and other characters in the play which demonstrates the matter of fate being overall more effectual on characters in the play than free will. From the time that Oedipus was born, everything around his has determined his outcome, all the way down to his personal characteristics (the theory of biological determinism).

  1. How does Kreon act as a foil to Oedipus in Sophocles' Oedipus the King?

    is assumed that he is screaming ?Thrones are won with money and men, you fool!? (Sophocles, 47) Through this argument between the two, it is made clear that unlike Kreon, who has the ability to be accused and still not act rashly, Oedipus? ego is severly hurt in the process.

  2. The significance of the fatal flaws of Meursault and Oedipus in The Outsider and ...

    Meursault is unable to attach emotion to events, nor is he able to recognise the emotional significance of such events. Meursault?s apathetic and indifferent character is profoundly revealed in Meursault?s own words shortly after his mother passed away: ?Mother died today.

  1. Symbolism/Imagery/Allegory in King Lear

    After Lear is booted out by Regan in her palace, he exclaims: ?We'll no more meet, no more see one another: but yet thou art my flesh, my blood, my daughter; or rather a disease that's in my flesh, which I must needs call mine: thou art a boil, a plague-sore, an embossed carbuncle, in my corrupted blood.

  2. Oedipus Rex Commentary. The excerpt taken from Oedipus Rex, written by Sophocles presents ...

    that breathe on the void and are void and exist and do no exist?? (Strophe 1, 1-4) builds a livelier and human like quality to inanimate objects, enhancing the exasperation the chorus feels towards Oedipus? late realization. Such that minor examples of personification aids apprehension of complex ideas, ?And though

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work