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History of Cafes in Paris

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Introduction

Ezel Poslu 9 May 2007 French Garden to Table Research Paper on French cafes HISTORY OF CAF�S IN PARIS Cafes. The places for socializing, getting drinks, having lunch, getting to know new people, getting online in the internet in the modern time in France. The structure of modern French caf�s that we see all over Paris was established over the course of almost four centuries. Beginning with the 17th century, caf�s brought a different order and perspective to French society, which still impacts French culture in the 21st century. Their functions and roles are made clear in the 20th century. The historical and social events that took place in between the 17th and 20th centuries gave shape to the modern French cafes. The arrival of coffee before the other exotic, new drinks in Europe and its growing fame were the main reasons for the need for caf�s in the 17th century. Social interactions and French revolution made the caf�s the places to gather and discuss the issues in society in 18th and 19th centuries. Through the end of the 20th century and in the beginning of 21st century, cafes started to take their final shape with the peace in society, and they became the places to socialize and get something to drink in nice places. Paris had always been known for its lust for drinking. By the time of the arrival of coffee in the city in the 1640s1, it became popular among the aristocrats. Coffee started to be served in private homes. French voyagers who traveled to the East brought coffee beans back as gifts for friends, and they prepared the new beverage for their friends.2 As its fame spread out among the aristocrats, coffee started to be served in two kinds of Parisian home by 1660s: at merchants' places who traded with the East to make profit, and at great lords' places who imported Italian chefs to experience the new drink before everyone else did. ...read more.

Middle

The wealthiest groups in society which were aristocracy and clergy were exempt from taxes. As a result, the taxation fell on the other 98 percent of the population, which were the rural poor population and the relatively wealthy members of the bourgeoisie.17 This financial crisis in France became an apparent subject in Paris, and people started to have discussions about it in caf�s. Coffeehouses, as being socializing and enlightening places of the time, became the centers of revolutionary background. Right before the French Revolution in 1789, cafes were full of furious and downtrodden people not only inside but also outside who tried to encourage the audience for a revolution against the government.18 Assemble of Notable, which consisted of the wealthiest members of the society, the clergy, aristocrats, and magistrate, came together to solve the financial crisis that was provoking the citizens. However, the Assembly of Notables failed to come up with a solution for the financial crisis, which caused King Louis XVI to convene the States General, an elected national assembly, for the first time in 150 years.19 However, it did not solve the problem either. In fact, it caused much confusion in the meeting between the assembly members. The public could not wait anymore for a change from the government and decided to make their own change. They took action on July 12th, 1789, at the Caf� de Foy. Young lawyer Camille Desmoulins set the French revolution in motion.20 A lot of people gathered right outside the gardens of the Palais Royal. The tension of the revolutionaries put the army in action soon. Desmoulins stood on a table outside the caf� with a pistol in his hand and shouted "To arms citizens! To arms!"21 His first move created huge chaos for the next couple of days. With this event, caf�s lost their fame as being the places to find peace, drink cups of coffee and enjoy the conversations. ...read more.

Conclusion

"The Coffeehouse Internet." A History of the World in 6 Glasses 16 Standage, Tom. "The Coffeehouse Internet." A History of the World in 6 Glasses 17 Standage, Tom. "The Coffeehouse Internet." A History of the World in 6 Glasses 18 Haine, W. Scott. "Regulation and Constraint." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 19 Standage, Tom. "The Coffeehouse Internet." A History of the World in 6 Glasses 20 Hussey, Andrew. "The Rise of Low Life." Paris, The Secret History New York 21 Standage, Tom. "The Coffeehouse Internet." A History of the World in 6 Glasses 22 Haine, W. Scott. "Women and Gender Politics: Beyond Prudery and Prostitution." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 23 Dejean, Joan. "The World's First High-Priced Lattes." The Essence of Style 24 Haine, W. Scott. "Regulation and Constraint." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 25 Haine, W. Scott. "The Social Construction of the Drinking Experience." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 26 "History of Alcoholism." 30 October 2006. 8 May 2007 <http://www.hoboes.com/Politics/Prohibition/Notes/Alcoholism_History/> 27 Haine, W. Scott. "Regulation and Constraint." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 28 Haine, W. Scott. "Regulation and Constraint." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 29 Haine, W. Scott. "Privacy in Public." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 30 Haine, W. Scott. "Women and Gender Politics: Beyond Prudery and Prostitution." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 31 Haine, W. Scott. "Regulation and Constraint." The world of the Paris caf�: Sociability among the French Working Class.1789-1914 32 Belle �poque was the era from 1895 to 1914, which was an epoch of beautiful clothes and the peak of luxury living for a select few-the very rich and very privileged through work. "La Belle �poque." Fashion Era. 7 May 2007. http://www.fashion-era.com/la_belle_epoque_1890-1914_fashion.htm 33Khazindar, Mona. "East Meets West: Arab Cafes in Paris." Arab News. 08 May 2007 <http://www.arabnews.com/>. 1 ...read more.

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