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Is a universal standard of justice possible?

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Introduction

´╗┐Is a universal standard of justice possible? The recent assassination of bin Laden by the US SEALs has sparked off considerable controversy across the globe. The debate remains on whether the US assassination of bin Laden was an act of justice or injustice.1 Upon hearing his assassination and seeing the jubilation erupting across the streets of America on TV, I felt detached from the general consensus that his death was worth celebrating let alone being ecstatic about it. Furthermore, the fact that Obama carefully used his words and said ?Justice has been done?2, leads me to question whether bin Laden?s assassination was an act of justice or Vengeance. If the latter is true, then wouldn?t his quote mean the same as ?Vengeance has been done? ? As a result, it sparked off my thinking as to when is vengeance justified, or are all forms of vengeance unjustified? What should justice be, who it should serve, and most importantly, is a universal standard of justice possible? ...read more.

Middle

Should we continue to think of justice on a national basis??6 Expanding on Peter Singer's' theory, philosopher Martha Nussbaum?s essay ?Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism? argues it is possible to extend our range of empathy beyond national boundaries in a cosmopolitan world if we forgo our nationalistic tendencies and ?puts right before country, and universal reason before the symbols of national belonging?7. The global trend towards increasing cosmopolitanism is taking place through technology, the internationalization of education and international organizations. The United Nations is one of the most significant influences towards increasing cosmopolitanism. A universal standard of justice will mostly likely be created through international treaties which form the basis of international cooperative organizations, such as the UN. However, the UN is at present hindered by the lack of a universal range of empathy ? a universal standard of justice is currently nonexistent, and the UN is divided between the different views of justice held by different interest groups operating within it. ...read more.

Conclusion

October 1, 1994. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://bostonreview.net/martha-nussbaum-patriotism-and-cosmopolitanism. Phillips, Macon. "Osama Bin Laden Dead." The White House. May 02, 2011. Accessed March 10, 2015. https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2011/05/02/osama-bin-laden-dead. Singer, Peter. "One World, Speech by Peter Singer." Utilitarian Philosophers. October 29, 2003. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://www.utilitarian.net/singer/by/20031029.htm. Whitehouse, Dr David. "Monkeys Show Sense of Justice." BBC News. September 17, 2003. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3116678.stm. 1 Mark Kersten. "The Justice and Legality of Bin Laden's Assassination: Is What Is Legal Necessarily Just?" Justice in Conflict. May 05, 2011. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://justiceinconflict.org/2011/05/05/the-justice-and-legality-of-bin-ladens-assassinatio n-is-what-is-legal-necessarily-just/. 2 Macon Phillips. "Osama Bin Laden Dead." The White House. May 02, 2011. Accessed March 10, 2015. https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2011/05/02/osama-bin-laden-dead. 3 Dr David Whitehouse. "Monkeys Show Sense of Justice." BBC News. September 17, 2003. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3116678.stm. 4 Ibid. 5 "Cosmopolitanism." Wikipedia. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmopolitanism. 6 Peter Singer. "One World, Speech by Peter Singer." Utilitarian Philosophers. October 29, 2003. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://www.utilitarian.net/singer/by/20031029.htm. 7 Martha Nussbaum C. "Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism." Bostonreview.net. October 1, 1994. Accessed March 11, 2015. http://bostonreview.net/martha-nussbaum-patriotism-and-cosmopolitanism. --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ 4 ...read more.

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