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A description of the use of ICT for internal and external communications of the business.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Task 6 E5, C3, A1: A description of the use of ICT for internal and external communications of the business. There are many internal and external communications within a company or business such as the following: * Internal: * Email May be used when fellow employees want to stay in contact, or other important things have to be shared. * Telephone: * Is used when contacting employees, as they may ask if they could do extra hours, or they are unable to come, or another form of illness. * Newsletters: * May be used to advertise McDonalds telling them about sale figures, good quality service etc. * External: * Intranet, e-mails, faxes or internet e-commerce may be set up for the working employees, giving information about the company, pay rates, shifts that they may work, etc. The use of ICT has increased having computers generating and managing information flows. A computer-based management information system provides the means to communicate, collect, store, summarise, analyse and present information in a way, which suits needs of managers. Computer systems can help organisations in many ways such as the following: * Produce complex information * Increase job satisfaction * Collect information at source * React to changes in the businesses environment * Communicate via the internet * Provide administration support * Produce complex information: A computer normally tends to process and communicate complex information. It also enables it to quickly identify developments within organisations like McDonalds that could threaten business objectives. It may be due to for example a sudden rise in unit costs or disappointing Computers have become an integral part of modern day life and are becoming increasingly important as teaching and training tools. In the work place and many other educational institutes computers and networks have become commonplace. This allows companies such as McDonalds and educational establishments to utilise many possible computer training and education techniques. ...read more.

Middle

Formal reports will have many of the following features: * Title page (subject matter, name and position of writer, date, etc.). * Contents page. * Terms of reference (explaining the reason for the report). * Procedure (how the task was completed). * Findings. * Conclusions and/or recommendations. When preparing a formal report, decisions have to be made on aspects such as language and style, circulation and the presentation (including whether the report should have a cover and binding). At the majority of meetings rising a point at a meeting is something many people do not feel comfortable about doing. The following might be a useful guide: * Scrutinise agenda items before you attend the meeting to see if there are any areas that may be of interest to you. * Research such areas of interest and obtain any associated reading materials. * Plan out, either in your mind or by making notes, what you might wish to say. * Listen to what others have to say before speaking yourself. * Timing is important. Make sure the point you make fits into the discussion. * Do not ramble on. * Be tactful, and do not deliberately upset someone. * Be assertive. * Make your contribution coherent. * Be ready for some sort of opposition by trying to anticipate the response you might receive to the points you are making. * Organizational databases: A database is a store of facts that can be called upon to provide information. A database may be used, for instance, in a bank or building society to store information on the state of all accounts. A database may be kept by a church to keep a record of all members of the congregation and their addresses. One may be used by a football club to keep a record of all tickets sold for various matches and so on. Organisations use databases for internal communication so that members of the organisation can quickly access records and information about all aspects of the business. ...read more.

Conclusion

One danger of a tight budgetary constraint is that it can be too restrictive and can make it difficult to develop a system that undertakes activities as efficiently as originally required. * Value for money: The most important element in any system design is that it should eventually result in the maximisation of benefit relative to cost. There are two ways of assessing whether or not a new system might provide value for money. Quantitative analysis identifies clear savings that have been made through the introduction of the new system e.g. fewer staff, less paperwork and reductions in other costs). Qualitative evaluation is more difficult as this identifies the ways in which a series of activities and services have improved as a result of spending on the new system. Though difficult to quantify, these are very important and may include higher morale, work that is less tedious and improved customer satisfaction. * Effects upon the efficiency of the user: Information and communications processing systems must be developed to meet the needs of a number of users. The overall aim should be to reduce the time taken to carry out activities, to increase the speed with which output is generated, to undertake a larger volume of work and to make it easier for the user to access and operate the system. It is important, therefore, when developing a system to consider the user's needs. * Capacity to retain and use information: The most important element in any system is its capacity to generate output. A good information system will have the right information available when required and in the form specified by the user. * Meeting LegaL and other requirements: Any system must take into account the requirements of the Data Protection Act and other legal requirements (e.g. concerning health and safety). * Improving security: If data or program security is important, a system must ensure unauthorised people do not access it. Security features may include electronic controls (such as passwords and data encryption) to ensure that the system is kept secure. Unit 1 Business At Work Jaspal S. Johal Page 1 of 23 ...read more.

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