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'Whatever it is, I'm afraid of the Greeks, even when they're offering gifts' How is Laocoon proved to be correct?

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Introduction

'Whatever it is, I'm afraid of the Greeks, even when they're offering gifts' How is Laocoon proved to be correct? Laocoon was the Priest of Neptune for the Trojans, at the time of the Trojan War, in Virgil's epic poem: The Aeneid. Laocoon first enters the story when the Greeks have left the Trojan Horse on the beach. Inside it are concealed many Greek heroes and warriors. The rest of the Greek army is hidden away on the not far off coast of Tenedos, creating the effect that they have gone home. The Trojan War has been going on for ten years, and this plan devised by Ulysses ended it. Half of the Trojans believe that they should destroy the horse, burn it, just get rid of it, but the other half believe it a gift from the Greeks, and want to drag it into the city. Laocoon rushes down from the citadel with a mob that agrees with him, scolding the Greeks for their stupidity. ...read more.

Middle

He tells a very convincing and very untrue story which makes the Trojans further believe in bringing the horse into the city, and gets him out of being killed by them. He says basically that since a sacrifice had to be made to get to Troy, a sacrifice - Sinon - had to be made to get back - this is part of the trick to make the Trojans think the Greeks have left. Sinon says he got away, and here he is. The Trojans feel sorry for him and now believe his further words because of it. He says the Trojan Horse was to appease the goddess Athena after they angered her. It is its size to stop the Trojans bringing it into their city and thereby gaining its protection. They believe it all blindly. There is one final reason that makes sense, both to the reader and the Trojans, and it confirms the first reason. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, when they are dragging it through the walls, the 'chink' of armour is heard inside, again, the Trojans take no notice. The feelings and reactions of the Trojans change a lot throughout the passage. At the beginning, they "were split into two camps", as I mentioned before, "undecided which course of action to support". As Sinon relates his lies, they are slowly turning more to believing the lies and wanting to drag the horse in. Laocoon, of course, is always there, blaring out the truth, that they will not listen to. When Laocoon is finally killed by the serpents, they are all a 'single camp', and all want to drag the horse in. Once it is in, believing Sinon's story and that Athena protects them, they are joyful and celebrate. Night falls, and they are drunk from their celebrations, and now Laocoon is proved right, and they meet what they deserved for not believing him. The Greeks creep out of the horse, and go around, killing the sentries and any Trojan they see. The rest of the Greek army is allowed back in, and Troy falls. ...read more.

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