• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"The paradox of Artaud lies in the fact that it is impossible to carry out his proposals."- (Grotowski) Discuss how this statement us true in light of what you know about his theories.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"The paradox of Artaud lies in the fact that it is impossible to carry out his proposals."- (Grotowski) Discuss how this statement us true in light of what you know about his theories. There is no straight forward answer to this question as there are many points to consider. The dictionary states that a paradox is; 'A statement etc. that seems to contradict itself or to conflict with common sense but which contains some truth' Grotowski wrote an essay on Artuad and his theories which was called " he wasn't entirely himself". In this essay he sums up Artauds achievements as they reflect on his own pratices in his idea of theatre but at the same time he challenges Artauds theories which trivialise him. To try and answer this question I am going to investigate some of Artauds theories for a successful theatre of cruelty, one which involved the audience, one that terrified and shook the audience to the point of real emotional fear. During Artauds life he made many proposals to stand against the usual. Artaud dismissed all Stanislavskian realism ideas as uninspired. Artaud wanted to tap into the unconscious; he envisioned theatre as a sensory experience which as to be cruel in the way it bombarded and overwhelmed the audience's senses. ...read more.

Middle

more emotional and personal for the audience involved, none of the audiences memories will be the same and therefore they may come out with mixed emotions some may have related the sound back to a happy time others to a time when they were sad. Another of Artaud's theories was to use language in a different way; this theory is linked to Artaud's theory on sound. Artaud had ideas for a 'new language' he mentioned this in many of his essays including The Theatre And It's Double but they were never clearly articulated. He wanted actors not to use the spoken language to communicate but a 'bodily language' that was based on signs and not words through gestures, postures and air-borne cries. This idea came from when he went to see the Balinese Theatre which he saw in the Colonial Exhibition in Paris in 1931. he said "I am well aware that a language of gestures and postures, dance and music is less able to define a character, to narrate a man's thought, to explain conscious states clearly and exactly, than spoken language". Here himself Artaud points out the problem with using gestures rather than spoken words, that a characters personality would not be completely known. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another of Artauds theories involved the positioning of the audience and the theatres 'stage' being around them so as to surround them. 'the auditorium will be enclosed within four walls, stripped of any ornament, with the audience seated below, in the middle, on swivelling chairs, allowing them to follow the show taking place around them.' (T&ID, 1985 p.75) Artaud wanted total sensory identification with the show he wanted the audience to feel like they were part of the show by including them in the show. He invaded the audience's personal space which forced the audience to take part with no show whether they wanted to or not, this was forcing them to share the actor's emotions and was making them live the experience, which was Artauds main idea. Artaud suggested that '... a kind of single, undivided local without partitions of any kind and this will become the very scene of the action' in other words there would be no traditional divide between the actors and the audience , this would enable and in fact force the audience to become part of the show themselves. In class we have being trying this theory a lot by placing the audience in the middle in different seating arrangements we were able to test how they felt safest and feel they felt the most exposed and involved in the actors movements. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How does Q. Tarantino use different film elements to make the audience want to ...

    The scene is set in a bar, possibly a caf� where breakfast/dinner is served. The colors are not contrastive nor bright or attention-grabbing because they give a sense of casualty and every day life. The woman wears a purple top, the man has jeans and a Hawaiian shirt on.

  2. SCHEDULING: WHERE POWER LIES IN TELEVISON

    In simple terms a schedule is a grid, dividing the broadcasting day into slots of thirty minutes duration. In the age of scarcity when television was broadcast live it was difficult to control the duration of the programme. However in the era of availability, individual programmes matter less than the integrity and the channel itself.

  1. How is the trailer for Mission Impossible Two constructed to attract an audience?

    Throughout this section there is a constant background filter in red, which adds to the felling of danger, other special effects include speeding up and slowing down and rewinds of sections. There are three captions "A John Woo Film", "Mission Impossible Two" and "MI2".

  2. Provide support for previous research findings that performance is adversely affected by noise, and ...

    We therefore used loud noise in the experiment to maximise the likelihood of finding evidence of the adverse affects of noise on performance. Further more the definition of noise above indicates that noise is by definition 'loud' so it was necessary to use loud music.

  1. Review of personal perfomance.

    This meant we were able to work on it every night after school over the following week to push forward each section. Before we started to think about devising a piece we all gave ideas of what we wanted to do, which ranged from life in prison, and levels of

  2. 'In the language of the actor to know is synonymous with to feel.'

    But if it were real' how would it be? (Stanislavsky.) The rehearse section gave me a chance to really stop worrying about my lines, but get inside my character. Become something other than myself, and really let me imagination run thought my character.

  1. Horner's main objective in "The Country Wife" is to sleep with as many ladies ...

    is also a contrast to how charming Horner is whilst in women's company, such as to Mrs Pinchwife, "She would make all that see her in love with her." This illustrates his deviousness, as he only wants to woo them into bed, especially as he later refers to her as, "A silly innocent."

  2. Alan Bennett's 'Talking Heads' inspired my initial idea.

    Nick was very interested in having detailed imaginative characters. Jamie was very inspired by symbolism and surrealism. Jenny wanted to create larger-than-life, flamboyant characters. I wanted the play to be different, not clich�d or too simple, it had to have a point and make the audience leave the theatre thinking.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work