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"A Streetcar Named Desire". The opening of the scene set the tone of the play. Discuss

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Introduction

The opening of the scene set the tone of the play. Discuss William introduces his protagonists in the opening scene through their real faces. A streetcar named desire was published in 1994. With the help of symbolism William has described the opening in such a way that it helps the reader to know the hints of what is going to be next. "Stanley [bellowing] : hey, there ! Stella, baby! Stella [mildly]: don't holler at me like that..." This shows the difference between husband and wife has been clearly shown. Stanley is uncivilized while Stella is polite and she seems civilized. "Stanley: catch! Stella: what? Stanley: Meat! ...read more.

Middle

She looks out of the place as the play says "her appearance is incongruous to this setting she is daintily dressed in a white suit with a fluffy bodice, necklace and ear rings of pearls, white gloves and hat, looking as if she was arriving at a summer tea or cocktail party..." White color is the symbol of purity and virginity. Blanche is not pure and nor is she virgin which we find later on. So Williams has ironically given her this dressing. " There is something about her uncertain manner, as well as her white clothes, that suggests a moth." She is compared to a moth. Moths are drawn from light and Blanche even doesn?t like staying in light. ...read more.

Conclusion

Later she talks to Stella, "...Never never never in my worse dream could I picture...". She expected Elysian Field to be like a place of what it literally means. She wanted peace but what she found was the opposite of it. Blue piano is played in the beginning of the play. It is expressed by Williams as 'a spirit of life that goes here' later in the play it mostly played on the moods of the characters. The opening of the scene does set the tones of the play through many symbols like bowling, the poker games and lots of drinking by men showed their dominance over women. The blue piano is the symbol of inter mingling of races which was accepted by the society. ...read more.

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