• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Chapter One of Great Gatsby

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Write about the ways in which Fitzgerald tells the story of the Great Gatsby in Chapter One... The Great Gatsby was written by F. Scott Fitzgerald during the 1920's, a period renowned for the moral failure of a society fixated with class and privilege. This obsession was dubbed "The American Dream" and through the Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald presents us with the conflict between the illusion and reality of the dream. Chapter one is very significant as it lays the foundations for the conflict and essentially prepares the reader for upcoming events. The novel begins in the present tense and is told through Fitzgerald's mouthpiece, Nick Carraway. It quickly becomes obvious to the reader that Nick is the narrator and moral focus of the story. His narration begins with some self-analysis, desperately trying to pin down pertinent aspects of his character. ...read more.

Middle

He finds himself living in a close 'proximity of millionaires', including his neighbour Jay Gatsby who lives in an impressive 'hotel de Ville' mansion right next door. The description of houses and locations in chapter one is hugely influential on the ideals that Fitzgerald has implemented in the story. Nick and Gatsby both reside in West Egg, a less fashionable suburb than nearby East Egg. West egg connotes the westward movement of followers of the American Dream. It symbolises new wealth, hope and prosperity. Whereas East Egg represents old America with its greed, arrogance and established riches. Although they are both located on the East Coast, Fitzgerald could still be hinting at the similar divide that exists between the west and east coasts of America. After jumping through different periods of history, 'Civil War... Columbus Story', the chapter gradually focuses more and more until eventually we meet more characters such as Tom and Daisy Buchanan. ...read more.

Conclusion

By the end of Chapter One, readers get the impression that Nick is an unreliable narrator with false credentials. He had earlier claimed to be non-judgemental, yet on numerous occasions he is scornful and condemning 'hard mouth and a supercilious manner.' This feeling amongst readers is developed further as it becomes evident that Nick is selective in what he says. For example, no real details are revealed to the reader regarding Gatsby or the affair with the girl in the west. It's almost as if Fitzgerald is tantalising the reader and drawing us in by deliberately holding back information. To conclude, Fitzgerald draws upon a number of techniques in order to set the scene and tell the story in chapter one. Analysis, symbols, descriptions and Dialogue effectively combine together to introduce the plot and entice readers in. However every one of these techniques revolves around Nick, who is fundamental to the novel. As I mentioned earlier, Nick acts as the narrative mouthpiece for Fitzgerald and without him, The Great Gatsby would not be a great read. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level F. Scott Fitzgerald section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level F. Scott Fitzgerald essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    HOW DOES FITZGERALD TELL THE STORY IN CHAPTER 1 OF THE GREAT GATSBY?

    5 star(s)

    The image of the "vines" adds to this feeling of oldness, and the "reflected gold" from the windows is a brazen allusion to wealth and prosperity. These images of landed power and settlement into the pinnacle of society contrast sharply to the image created by Gatsby's house.

  2. HOW DOES FITZGERALD TELL THE STORY IN CHAPTER 6 OF THE GREAT GATSBY?

    The first setting portrayed to the reader in Chapter 6 the "insidious flat on Lake Superior", which is where James Gatz first met Dan Cody. This seems to be a rather desolate place, no doubt indicative of the desolate and 'unimportant' life which Gatz leads.

  1. Three characters in The Great Gatsby and the theme of obsession

    Gatsby's greatest flaw is his inability to see that the wealth of a man can never be defined in dollars and cents. Unfortunately, for Gatsby he doesn't live to understand that flaw.. However his one true friend Nick Carraway and the father he denied publically for the sake of wealth and status understood it all along.

  2. Tender is the night - To what extent is Dick an embodiment of American ...

    When he began his career he was a non-entity without any education, qualifications or career, but through the army succeeded in life to become an important figure in the American military service. He is linked with Dick as like him he was affected by a post war era.

  1. "Nick's main attitude to east coast society is fascination." How far, and in what ...

    due to the fact that I think Fitzgerald meant Daisy to represent the East Coast as a whole. Another main situation in the novel where we see what Nick thinks about the society is up to and during Gatsby's parties.

  2. Chapter One Essay Questions

    many men the opportunity to have a stable job and an adventure. It is also revealed that Nick was educated at an Ivy League university (Yale), again reflecting his upper class standings. It is mentioned several times in the chapter that Nick "went to college" and can be interpreted as rather boastful.

  1. The American Dream is what drives the characters in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

    The war led to an economic boom as more and more people were buying materialistic items that they would have never bought. With this economic boom it became apparent that any person of any social status could become wealthy. This created the social rift between the families that had just found new money and the old wealthy industrialists.

  2. "The Great Gatsby" Chapter one analysis

    His tolerance has a limit, and it is the challenge to this limit that forms the basis of the book at hand. As the chapter continues, more of Nick's background is discussed: the way in which he was raised and his moral character.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work