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Pride and Prejudice chapter 19. In this chapter we see Elizabeths response towards Mr. Collins proposal and his reactions towards her

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice Chapter 19 Jane Austen in chapter 19 of her novel Pride and Prejudice starts the chapter off using a telling method to describe the settings in a third person narrative. In this chapter we see Elizabeth's response towards Mr. Collins proposal and his reactions towards her as Austen describe his proposal at the beginning of the chapter. Austen shows the reader Mr. Collins stupidity through a dialogue between him and Elizabeth using a showing method. Austen presents a lot of humour and satire which ridicules Mr. Collins shallow characteristics when he presents his reasons for marriage by saying "firstly...secondly". Mr. Collins begins the chapter by saying to Mrs. Bennet in a formal way that he wants some private time with her fair daughter Elizabeth as it is stated "he set about it in a very orderly manner with all the observances, which he supposed a regular part of the business." This shows the reader that Mr Collins was going have an important meeting while sticking to tradition implying that he was quite boring as he does what is expected of him and tries to observe the customs of society.This can immediately inform the readers that he is about to propose to Elizabeth, the only thing that is left is her acceptance. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore, Mr. Collins character is being presented as humorous and very idiotic. He adds humour to his dialogue when in fact he is actually trying to be serious. Jane Austen mocks his characteristics as she has made him pompous and arrogant clergyman in a romantic situation. Mr Collins also feels as though he is superior towards Elizabeth. He is also presented very sophisticated and logical as he uses connectives to structure his speech "firstly...secondly" This is also shown in his language, which is also structured. He talks in the first person and uses rich vocabulary words as he says "condescended", "vivacity" and "uniformly". This again shows that as a clergyman that he is very familiar with giving speeches and sermons. It is almost like a he planned what he wanted to say to Elizabeth as it has an introduction, a main focal part and a conclusion. When he informs Elizabeth his reasons for marrying her, he makes it perfectly clear that he is a very narrow minded and superficial, in addition when he moved from one girl to the next so hastily in chapter 15. As he presents his reasons, he says that he is doing them a favour, as he states "... ...read more.

Conclusion

During his proposal before he also makes a lot of annoying repetitions, such as saying how he will inherit their house when her father passes away, but whenever he said that he says "which may not be for several years", this kind of repetition was irrelevant and irritating. Austen uses repetition to emphasize his points of marrying Elizabeth, for him it sounded perfect for proposal whereas for Elizabeth she thought he was quite pompous for repeating about his wealth. Austen has used quite a lot of sarcasm in Elizabeth's and Mr. Collins response. As Mr. Collins tells Elizabeth she is "uniformly charming!" with the use of exclamation mark at the end to emphasize on his sarcasm. His pride has been degraded and his highly shocked by this. This chapter in Pride and Prejudice perfect example of satirical prose as Austen uses ironic speeches and dialogues to achieve this effect. The conversation that takes place between Mr. Collins and Elizabeth perfectly explains that Elizabeth is a woman who will not marry a man she doesn't love regardless of their wealth or high status. Austen in this chapter also makes it clear for the readers that Mr. Collins is a foolish man with huge amount of pride in him when he carries out his proposal unemotionally. Amina Bibi ...read more.

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