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Coastal Processes

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Aims of the Experiment * Aims in 3 bullet points ----------------------------------------. Page 3 Introduction - Diagrams, Pictures and Photos * Picture of our residence --------------------------------------- Page 3 * Diagram of waves' energies ------------------------------------ Page 4 * Constructive waves diagram ----------------------------------- Page 5 * Destructive waves diagram ------------------------------------ Page 5 * Erosion - Corrosion/Abrasion diagram ------------------------ Page 6 * Erosion - Scouring diagram ------------------------------------ Page 7 * Erosion - Hydraulic Action diagram --------------------------- Page 7 * Erosion - Solution diagram ------------------------------------. Page 8 * Erosion - Attrition diagram -----------------------------------. Page 8 * Longshore Drift diagram --------------------------------------. Page 9 * Porlock Bay map ------------------------------------------------ Page 11 * Porlock Bay sketch --------------------------------------------- Page 12 * Porlock Bay formation ----------------------------------------- Page 13 * Picture of Porlock Bay overview ------------------------------ Page 14 * Waves formation diagram ------------------------------------- Page 14 * Photo of Porlock Bay overview -------------------------------- Page 15 * Solutions - Offshore submerging breakwater diagram -----. Page 17 * Solutions - Rip-rap diagram ----------------------------------- Page 18 * Tabulated effectiveness of solutions ------------------------ Page 18 * Porlock Bay idea map ------------------------------------------ Page 20 Introduction - Information, Reasoning's and Analysis' * Coast definition ------------------------------------------------ Page 3 * Wave definition ------------------------------------------------ Page 4 * Wave factors --------------------------------------------------. Page 4 * Constructive Wave information ------------------------------- Page 5 * Destructive Wave information -------------------------------- Page 5 * Erosion - Corrosion/Abrasion information -------------------- Page 6 * Erosion - Scouring information -------------------------------- Page 6 * Erosion - Hydraulic Action information ----------------------- Page 7 * Erosion - Solution information -------------------------------- Page 7 * Erosion - Attrition information ------------------------------- Page 8 * Longshore Drift information ----------------------------- Pages 8 & 9 * Longshore Drift & Its Properties ----------------------- Pages 9 & 10 * Porlock Bay formation information ---------------------------. Page 13 * Porlock Bay story and situation ------------------------. Pages 14 & 15 * Solutions - Beach Nourishment information ----------- Pages 15 & 16 * Solutions - Groynes information ------------------------------ Page 16 * Solutions - Submerging breakwaters information ----. ...read more.

Middle

21 29 28 34 15 53 20 33 13 30 07 52 11 66 16 02 28 05 03 27 24 83 22 40 26 16 27 07 07 51 13 55 12 10 14 21 06 18 27 66 20 96 03 83 22 03 14 29 05 69 23 74 26 04 23 21 28 73 25 96 28 28 11 89 00 14 23 44 29 03 02 04 19 35 14 00 01 88 20 40 12 85 26 89 27 55 08 32 02 75 03 31 02 02 04 91 15 54 10 95 25 20 27 60 16 92 16 22 01 74 12 53 08 51 26 24 08 92 27 47 01 79 26 35 03 66 04 67 20 99 26 11 08 19 06 87 20 19 14 09 03 61 17 85 08 70 27 25 23 38 02 10 11 54 15 12 06 77 27 81 22 07 20 22 19 28 20 18 01 20 22 53 05 32 17 75 24 32 Sheet 4 - powers index {BEACH PROFILE GRAPH HERE} From the graph paper above, which tells us how the beach profile looks, we understand that at low tide, Gore Point has a less amount of facets compared to the Hurlestone Point beach profile. I also analysed the facet angle comparison between the two beaches. Gore Point has more steeper facets, whereas, Hurlestone Point has less steeper facets. The East side of Porlock Bay, Hurlestone Point has longer and more facets than in the west beach. We recorded each facet and its angle, whilst on the beach here is a table we made with the information on the facets. West East Facet No. Length Angle Facet No. Length Angle The Sea 1. 11.3 8 The Sea 1. 2.0 8 2. 10.9 7 2. 3.2 14 3. 3.2 16 3. 6.3 17 4. 5.8 18 4. 3.7 3 5. 1.7 4 5. 8.4 20 6. 4.4 27 6. ...read more.

Conclusion

Pebbles - A rounded piece of rock that is larger than gravel Population - All of the people inhabiting a specified area. Preference - The selecting of someone or something over another or others. Pressure - The application of continuous force by one body on another that it is touching; compression. Proposal - A plan that is proposed. Reside - To live in a place permanently or for an extended period Resistant - A force that tends to oppose or retard motion. Resort - A place frequented by people for relaxation or recreation Revetments - A cheaper alternative to sea walls is the revetment. This is a sloping feature, which breaks up or absorbs the energy of the waves but may let water and sediment pass through. The older wooden revetment consists of posts fixed into the beach with wooden slats between. Salt Marsh - A salt marsh is a coastal marsh that forms on mud flats. They usually form in very sheltered inlets and estuaries, or behind spits (places where fine sediment accumulates). Salt marshes form as vegetation builds up on these mud flats. Seabed - The floor of the sea or the ocean. Seawater - The mixture of water and various dissolved salts found in the world's oceans and seas. Shallow - Measuring little from bottom to top or surface; lacking physical depth. Shore - The land area bordering a relatively large water body like a lake or ocean Solution - when certain types of cliff erode as a result of weak acids in the sea. Swash - A bar over which waves wash freely. Tide - the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon Tourists - One who travels for pleasure. Trade - The people working in or associated with a business or industry Unattractive - lacking beauty or charm Wave - A moving swell or ridge on the surface of a solid or liquid or within the medium of a gas. ...read more.

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