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Follow up to North Norfolk Fieldwork.

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Introduction

Essay assignment-Follow up to North Norfolk Fieldwork Introduction The area of North Norfolk that I shall be studying stretches from Hunstanton in the west to Weybourne in the east, a stretch of coastline over thirty miles long. Within this relatively short stretch of coastline are a great variety of coastal landforms. It is a coastline of contrasts. In the four areas I studied the cliffs are in retreat, often at a rate of several feet a year. I will examine the processes at work on the cliffs, both coastal and sub-aerial, as well as the ways in which geology interacts with these processes. At Weybourne Hope the boulder clay cliffs are intensely eroded. While at Blakeney Point the coast changes to on in which deposition dominates. This spit has a profound affect on the area between it and the old coastline. In this zone there is a great variety of marsh scenery both natural and man-made. At Wells there is a good example of how the marshes have been partially reclaimed and the land defended from wave attack. While at Hunstanton the contrast is especially great due to the distinct geology of the area. Weybourne Hope At Weybourne Hope there is a very good example of a coastline, which is rapidly eroding. The cliff is made up of loose glacial material, from a period called the Pleistocene period. ...read more.

Middle

Long shore drift has played a part but it is agreed that dominant northeast winds have moved the material along the coast. The shingle is coarser at the eastern end compared with the material further down. This occurs because as the material is being moved attrition can occur this means the particles can rub together and break apart also the waves would be able to carry smaller particles further because they take less energy to move. Marshland has built up in the sheltered low energy zones. It is obvious that the two main plants that do well in this area are spartina and salicornia. Sand dunes have classic examples of plant succession occurring on them. Towards the sea there are embryo dunes, which are tiny dunes that have been made by the wind depositing sand in sheltered areas such as behind driftwood. These then build up into the main ridge otherwise known as yellow dunes. These dunes tend to have a high percentage cover of vegetation because there more sheltered and the roots of the plants can have a wide area to spread around. Next are the grey dunes, these dunes having a diverse number of species; this is because the sand is slowly turning into soil because when the pioneer species die they put nutrients and minerals into the soil, this is called humus. ...read more.

Conclusion

Long shore drift is moving the material west. This beach is open and exposed the waves are destructive even though the fetch is relatively small because it starts at the other side of the wash. Hunstanton Hunstanton is a small purpose built town next to the sea it is established on the west coast of Norfolk, facing the wash. North of the town, beyond the more tourist side of the town are the unique Hunstanton cliffs made up of different types of material. The cliffs are quite high approximately fifteen meters. The beach is gentle sloping but wide and with a very small fetch. There are three types of rock in the Hunstanton cliffs, the bottom layer is Carstone the middle layer is Hunstanton red rock and the top layer is Chalk strata. There is a wave cut platform present at Hunstanton. The fetch and exposure are small then the area at Weybourne because of the wash, which means the waves, would have less power that means less erousion. As you walk back towards the town there is a sea wall, this is a very expensive sea defence but works well. Conclusion All these areas are effected differently, the cliffs at Hunstanton are different of those at Weybourne because of factors like the size of the fetch and geology of the area. Blakeney Pointis different from the other coastlines because of the deposition features. Wells shows how land can be reclaimed and how "soft" sea defences can be used. ...read more.

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