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Geographical Investigation into sub session on the Studland Heath Land.

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Introduction

Name: Chris Carter Tutor: 12RJ Candidate Number: 3032 Year 12 Environmental Investigation Geographical Investigation into sub session on the Studland Heath Land Content Page Contents..................................................................1 Introduction................................................................2 .................................................................3 Method....................................................................4 Analysis...................................................................5 Statistical Analysis.......................................................5 ......................................................6 Conclusion...............................................................7 Introduction Aims: The key question for this enquiry is: "How and why does vegetation change along a psammosere succession?" This question states that, I must investigate into how the vegetation changes on the sand dunes through the heath land. With this key question, there are subheadings as shown below: * How does the number of plant species change through the succession? This question states, that I must show how the vegetation changes through the succession. * How does plant cover change through the succession? This question states that, I must show how the plant cover (percentage of vegetation) changes through the succession. * How do the soil properties of pH, organic content and moisture content change along the succession? This Question states that, I must show how the pH changes, the organic content and moisture change through the succession. ...read more.

Middle

* Distance (using the Ranging poles and measuring tape) must be recorded. All the results taken must be as accurate as possible, otherwise anomalous results may occur and a investigation would be unfair and false. Analysis As the sand to succession goes on, there is a trend. As the succession goes on we see 3 belts (see fig. 3), the first being the Marram grass, then the heather (maybe some gorse) and then trees. However how does this happen? When the Marram grass dies, it is deposited into the grown, and because all decomposition of the grass gives off acid, it makes the ground more acidic everytime the grass dies (this is shown by the pH levels in fig 4 on the graphs sheet) and also fertilises the soil making it richer in minerals. Then heather a lover of acidic soil and has long thin roots, which can hold onto the soil (sand). The heather being a lover of acidic soils, it is more acidic then the Marram grass, and when the heather decomposes into the soil trees then set in, ...read more.

Conclusion

I thought that the biomass would increase (because of larger plants dying) or decrease (the larger plants would use more minerals etc.) Conclusion My findings in light of my initial aims is that, the succession is left due to the nature of plants would become woodland. This would mean if all heath lands were left, after some time there would be no heath lands left. I have also found out why and how the heath land occurs, due to Marram grass (being a pioneer (the first) plant) makes the soil acidic, leading on to heather and eventually on to trees. This is all based on the acidity of soil. Also my results don't show what I thought I would see, in the results of the biomass (Fig 7). I thought I would see a trend, I thought I would see the bio decrease due to heavy usage by the trees, then less usage from the heather and then the Marram grass. However I either have anomalous results or there is indeed no trend to the biomass. 6 ...read more.

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