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Illustrate how to promote service users` rights and responsibilities.

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Introduction

Assessment Objective One Illustrate how to promote service users` rights and responsibilities. In care settings the term quality practice is used to describe the promotion of service users` rights, which are essentially the same rights that are afforded to everyone else, such as the right to marry and freedom of expression; Care workers must actively promote the rights of service users in order to maintain quality practice. For this assignment I am going to discuss three rights that service users have; the right to make complex decisions, to make their own choices and to dignity and privacy, and why it is important that these rights are upheld. In the latter part of this assignment the tensions that can arise in care settings will be examined, as well as possible solutions. Service users have the right to make complex decisions Service users should be encouraged to make decisions for themselves and must always be consulted on matters that will affect them. If a carer makes decisions for a service user without first gaining their input, then this would be in violation of the service users` individual rights under article three of the Human Rights Act, (Fisher, 2006). If a service user has difficulty with making decisions then they could benefit from having an advocate appointed. An advocate could be someone close to the service user, such as a friend, family member or perhaps a trained volunteer who, when using citizen advocacy, will speak on their behalf. It would be inappropriate for a carer or care manager to take on this role; having an advocate who is under no pressure to meet the needs of the organisation is essential as an advocate must represent the best interests of the service user. An advocate must be able to communicate effectively, be sensitive and supportive towards the service user, be honest, and have patience with them. The use of advocacy may be needed because the service user: * wishes to make a complaint * wants a change ...read more.

Middle

For example, when a service user is deciding on what treatments to opt for a carer should provide them with required information, but allow 'them' to make the choice, or when getting a service user dressed in the morning a service user should be able to tell the carer what they want to wear, and have the carer help them to put it on. Essentially, a carer should be assisting the service user to maintain their lifestyle (by as much as is possible) by providing the necessary care, rather than the service user altering their lifestyle to fit in with how the care setting is run. Service users have the right to dignity and privacy According to the National Health Service 'dignity is understood as encompassing respect, recognition, autonomy, independence and identity', (endoflifecare.nhs.uk). To treat someone with dignity is to treat them with a recognition of their rights as a human being, and involves showing respect no matter a person' age, ethnicity, creed or gender. Some experiences in later life, such as health problems, bereavement, increased dependence on others and other significant life changes, can pose a threat to older peoples' sense of dignity, (Bristol.ac.uk). For instance, increasing dependence could make a person feel burdensome, and issues such as losing control of bodily functions could cause a person to feel undignified and embarrassed of themselves, which in turn can have detrimental effects on a person's self-esteem. Care workers must adopt the right attitude, and show respect to service users so that they can maintain their sense of dignity. One way that carers can display respect is by showing service users that they are listened to by using the correct body language, such as nodding and using eye contact. It should also be remembered that some individuals prefer to be addressed by their title and surname, rather than their first name. For example, an elderly woman may prefer to be called Mrs Smith, and find being called Emily, her first name, by the carers to be very disrespectful. ...read more.

Conclusion

which case the carers must try to put a stop to it, he could be upset because a pet died or be feeling 'second best' since the birth of a sibling, in which case he would need reassurance and comforting. Tensions may also occur between service users; this could be due to arguments, inappropriate language or irritation at the other`s behaviour. Whatever the case, the care worker must adopt a polite, calm and non-confrontational manner in talking to them, in order to come to a solution or compromise. Using active listening and effective communication skills are essential if a solution is to be found, (Fisher, 2006). Summary Caring involves: * Providing for physical needs (such as dressing and bathing) * Providing for emotional needs (such as promoting self-esteem) * Having excellent communication skills * Remaining objective * Upholding individuals' rights (such as the right to dignity) * Helping people to reach their highest possible level of independence * Having patience and understanding Service users have the right to make decisions and everyday choices for themselves; this right can be upheld by providing an advocate to speak on the service user`s behalf if they are unable to speak for themselves, or teaching them the skills needed to speak on their own behalf, providing clear and up to date information on the options available to them, and making sure they understand what they are entitled to expect. Service users have the right to dignity and privacy; this right can be upheld by showing respect to service users, listening to their wishes, and making them feel valued. Service users should also be able to have time to themselves if and when they wish. Tensions can arise in care settings for numerous reasons, and depending on what the situation calls for; resources will have to be allocated as fairly as possible and on the basis of need, boundaries of the law must be respected, and tensions between and within individuals must be negotiated to come to amicable solutions. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

This is an excellent essay on the rights of service users. It has a lot of good and relevant examples and also has excellent referencing throughout.

It could be enhanced in a couple of areas, particularly that of communication and barriers. A little more theory would help.

*****

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 26/06/2013

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