• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Britains attempts to appease Mussolini in the 1930s were successful Explain why you agree or disagree with this view.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Daryan Omar ?Britain?s attempts to appease Mussolini in the 1930?s were successful? Explain why you agree or disagree with this view. (24 marks) Britain?s attempt to appease Mussolini were successful up until the Abyssinian crisis of 1935, as Italy were not in league with Germany but on the contrary, were opposed to German expansion and revision of the treaty of Versailles. However after the Abyssinian crisis, this stance from Mussolini disappeared and changed greatly. Hence British attempts becoming unsuccessful, as ultimately Mussolini entered the Second World War on the side of Germany. Britain and Italy?s relationship was cordial before the Abyssinian crisis, indicating success in their appeasement policies. The Stresa front of 1935 between: Britain, France and Italy manifested this, as they agreed to prevent further revision of the treaty from Hitler and to resist him in his expansionist aims, and to also condemn Hitler?s actions. The Stresa front was suggested by Mussolini himself who was very co-operative and acted on the side of Britain and France as they all shared the same opinion on German rearmament. ...read more.

Middle

This is another example of British success in their appeasement policies. Before the Hoare-Lavale pact was leaked into to the public, it seemed as if Mussolini would accept this proposal. Hitherto the pact, Hoare, the British secretary worked well with Italy, and demonstrated a close relationship. If Mussolini had accepted then it would be a success, as Mussolini would still be on the side of Britain. This could be seen as some sort of success, as at first it did seem that it would be successful. Ultimately, it was a failure of British appeasement, as Mussolini did not accept the proposal to ?save face?. However, there were also many examples of British failure of appeasement, such as the Anglo-German Naval Agreement, which was poor example of British policy, as it did nothing but completely undermine, consequently damaging the Stresa front irrevocably. As it angered Mussolini greatly and it was almost as if Britain were stabbing the other members of the Front in the back, as they condemned Germany in the Stresa Front and then signed an agreement with them, allowing them some sort of navy. ...read more.

Conclusion

The acceptance of the Anschluss from Italy was a great success for Germany and a greater blow to the treaty and Britain. Mussolini invaded and conquered Abyssinia in the end, which was the result of Britain?s half-hearted sanctions. This also gave confidence to both Mussolini and Hitler, as it showed them how feeble and indecisive Britain during the Abyssinian crisis, giving them the impression that they could perform such acts again. In conclusion, Britain?s policies of appeasement were successful up until the Hoare-Laval pact, as from then on; British appeasement failed and became unsuccessful, because Italy ended up on Germany?s side in the Second World War. Also after the Abyssinian crisis, appeasement could be seen as an unnecessary policy, due to the fact that Mussolini was on Hitler?s side. Yet Britain pressed on with appeasement, such as the Easter Accords, which accepted the status quo of the Middle East and Abyssinia, but this is negligible as Mussolini did not actually stick to it and did not achieve anything. The successful examples were not significant overall, as the unsuccessful cases were more prevalent and outweigh them. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Why was the League of Nations a failure in the 1930's?

    Britain and France were divided in the issue, with Britain feeling it would allow Germany to rebuild its navy to a certain extent and the French totally against Germany. This failure is an example of the League's lack of unity.

  2. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    The trial was conducted in a whirlwind on publicity and media coverage, and it demonstrated to the citizens of the Soviet Union that the old Bolsheviks were not heroes, but instead dangerous traitors who are dealt with quickly and efficiently.

  1. Were the 1930's the Devils Decade or The Dawn of Affluence?

    the population was suffering from some sort of dietary deficiency and more shockingly that one tenth of the population were "chronically ill-nourished". The Cole brothers, again social investigators, also conducted a study between a working class family and a middle class family, it revealed that the middle class family ate

  2. Reasons for Napoleon's Success (to 1807).

    * Perhaps Napoleon saw Spain as another country he could add to his empire. Spain was in the hands of the weak Charles IV and the Queen's favourite Chief Minister, Godoy. * In 1795, Spain had been forced to make peace with France.

  1. Hitlers Germany

    By June 4 a motley armada of ships, from liners to tugboats, had succeeded in evacuating to Britain some 220,000 British and 112,000 French soldiers. The public in Britain was unaware of the extent of the catastrophe. The press even hailed the "Miracle of Dunkirk" as victory.

  2. Reasons behind Britains Policy of Appeasement in the 1930s

    By 1928 all men and women over the age of 21 had gained the right to vote and by the mid 1930s the British electorate was huge. It was clear to all politicians that the vast majority of the British public were opposed to war.

  1. Explain whether you agree or disagree with this statement - "The league of nations ...

    Again in 1920 the league settled a dispute between Germany and Poland over Upper Silesia. In 1922 the league provided financial support to Austria after her economy was in the state of collapsing. The league acted swiftly in 1925 when it stopped a Greek invasion on Bulgaria as a result

  2. Was appeasement the only option open to Britain in 1938-1939?

    Taylor explains "Despite appearances, she was a state of nationalities, not a national state"5. This unwillingness to fully recognise the legitimacy of the Czech state, along with their dislike of the Czech nationals led them to the conclusion that the Czech boarder, as set out by the Versailles settlement, was

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work