• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Destined for success. To what extent do you agree that this is a fair summary for the start of Henry VIIIs reign?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History Essay: ?Destined for success? ? To what extent do you agree that this is a fair summary for the start of Henry VIII?s reign? Henry VII a King described to be compared to a toddler learning to ride a bicycle; after many falls and uncertainties he finally found stability. However he became King of England in 1485 after defeating Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, meaning he was the Lancastrian champion against the Yorkists (War of the Roses). He took over a country damaged and torn from many years of war and instability, the Crown had changed hands six times from the time of Henry VI?s mental breakdown in 1453 to Henry VII?s victory. It was clear that Henry VII had some job to do in order to consolidate the country and frankly keep the throne. The best asset Henry VII had was that he was able to spot what problems the country had and was to try and solve them; he first saw that the crown had not seen true stability since the reign of Edward III all the way back in 1327-1377 in which the successor of him Richard II was to blame for the many years of conflict in the War of the Roses where Henry VII was to end it all. ...read more.

Middle

and Arthur this conjured up a strong alliance with the seen most dominant power, Spain. It was evident Arthur had learnt all he knew from his weary father. Following Arthurs death, Henry VII?s third child became heir and would come to the throne in 1509 at just 17 years old. He was somewhat unprepared for the position, as it had been intended that he would pursue a clerical career and perhaps become Archbishop of Canterbury. This lack of preparation and education is seen in the heavy influence during the early years of Henry's reign of older statesmen such as Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. Many in England believed that the succession of Henry VIII would usher in a less austere era than the one Henry VII had ruled over. While Henry VII was seen as being a less than colourful character, Henry VIII was viewed as the opposite and many hoped that the whole royal court would become a more colourful environment. Arthur received the education and training that a future king required while Henry effectively stayed in the background. Arthur?s unexpected death meant that Prince Henry had to learn quickly about the task of kingship. ...read more.

Conclusion

He gave his son an inevitable successful. Henry VIII inherited a state that was united and behind the monarch, a state that had a decent European reputation, a monarchy that was wealthier than it had been for centuries, a nobility that had been tamed and made to work for the Crown and a system of government that was competent and effective. A country not at war, was solvent was not racked by faction, that was more centralised in its administration than ever before. Henry VII was about “gold or gems or precious stones” whereas Henry VIII was about “Virtue, glory and Immortality, showing that Henry VII was concerned with giving England a wealth and stability within that wealth unlike his naïve son he was only concerned for himself and spending all his ‘fathers money’. “the crown was vastly stronger than it had been in 1485, but it was no nearer to being absolute” it was safe to say Henry VIII wasn’t walking in to a weak state, his father might not of fully perfected England but then what country is exactly ‘absolute’ even to this modern day. He did everything a king should do and the things that are frowned upon had to be done for the benefit of England. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Henry VIII'S Foreign Policy.

    Neither of these campaigns directly served English interests. Ferdinand of Aragon persuaded Henry to campaign in Aquitaine so that he could recapture Navarre from the French (which he did, in spite of the dismal performance of English troops). Therouanne was a French fortress which threatened Maximilian's Burgundian territories, whilst Tournai was a French enclave in Burgundy.

  2. Securing the Tudor Dynasty: The Reign of Henry VII.

    Foreign powers can also be seen to support pretenders, which reduced the stability of Henry's throne.

  1. To What Extent Was Henry Vll Secure?

    by John de la Pole crossed to England and were defeated by Henrys forces. Margaret of Burgundy also supported Simnel as she was brother of Richard III and wanted to see the Lancastrians defeated. When Simnel was caught he was pardoned, this suggested he was just a puppet in the hands of the Yorkists.

  2. Explore the Nature of Kingship In "Henry V".

    Henry is also viewed as a very religious king. Henry himself tells us how he views him self as a religious man "We are no tyrant but a Christian king". Henry always believes that God is on his side in his claims and in battle. "But this all lies within the will of god".

  1. How Far Did Henry VIII's Government in 1509 to 1514 differ from that of ...

    also to pass a law to demonstrate a change from his father, called the Commission on Oyer and Terminer which was set up to investigate abuses under Henry VII set up in July 1509, showing his new style of kingship and his zero tolerance policy to gain support and confidence

  2. How far was England a Catholic Country by the end of Henry VIII's reign ...

    The argument which would appear to hold the most strength is that which suggests England still remained in a position of "National Catholicism" at the time of Henry's death, and this incorporates many of the ideas already outlined. The removal of the Pope meant that there was no way England

  1. In what ways and to what extent does the concept of Spain's 'Golden Age' ...

    These proved to be of some success to Philip as his financial position increased. However, Philip's financial policies were unpopular. But, Philip managed to receive a large amount of annual income from the Indies, in the form of silver and custom duty taxes.

  2. Is it fair to describe Bevin as a great foreign secretary?

    This in itself was a wise tactical decision in dealing with the sensitivity of the situation with India towards the end of the war and repairing some of the damage caused by British military commanders. "The insensitivity of Lord Wavell towards the Indian leaders and his disastrous relationship with Whitehall was a source of constant embarrassment".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work