• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far do you agree that the actions of the USSR were primarily responsible for the division of Germany in 1949?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far do you agree that the actions of the USSR were primarily responsible for the division of Germany in 1949? After the end of World War Two there were many meetings, including the Potsdam Conference, between the leaders of England, America and the USSR. It could be argued that the actions of the USSR were primarily responsible for the division of Germany in 1949, however this could be debated. Personally I think the actions of the USSR were primarily responsible. One of the reasons why the actions of the USSR were primarily responsible is due to Stalin's determination and need for a buffer zone for the USSR. The Battle of Berlin alone had resulted in over 300,000 casualties for the USSR and they had suffered more deaths in the war than England and America and so felt they needed the security more. Taking harsh reparations from Germany would render it weak and unable to attack again, providing the security that Stalin needed. ...read more.

Middle

A final reason was due to Stalin imposing the Berlin Blockade which led to Cold War tensions, the creation of NATO and the FRG. In June 1948, in response to the currency reforms, Stalin blocked all land and water routes to the Western zones and West Berlin, meaning that the USA and England had to fly in resources to the inhabitants there. At the height of the blockade, a plane left Tempelhof airport every 90 seconds, and the people of West Berlin were supplied with food and fuel. The Berlin Airlift made the division impossible to avoid, and it was due to this that the beginning of NATO was discussed. Stalin had essentially split Berlin of his own accord, showing that it was the actions of the USSR that were primarily responsible. On the other hand, the events and future of Germany were due to the wider context of Cold War rivalry. It is unknown as to whether or not the division was planned at the Potsdam conference or not or if the formal decision to split Germany remained open until a letter from Stalin in 1952. ...read more.

Conclusion

The creation of bi-zonia, meaning two zones, had also split up the country which was not all the USSR's idea, showing that it would be unfair to suggest that it was mainly the actions of the USSR that caused the divide in Germany in 1949. Stalin thought that this was created as an anti-Soviet area and so felt threatened, in response trying to build up his area of Germany for security as a 'buffer' zone. His proposal in 1947 for a German government was rejected in order to stop communism, so to Stalin it would have felt like all of the allies were against him. To conclude, I think that it was the USSR's actions that were primarily responsible for the divide in Germany in 1949 because Stalin didn't respond to problems well. By the Berlin Blockade he made the division inevitable since the US and England had to fly supplies into the area. As well as this he promoted communism in his area when the US had clearly said that was the last thing they wanted and were fully intent on trying to stop communism throughout the world. ?? ?? ?? ?? Devon Harper 12JXM ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This is a balanced response which considers the key points on both sides of the debate. There could be more specific detail in places, including the use of dates and statistics. Some of the arguments could be developed further. 3 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 17/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Creative Writing - War.

    I was able to count the days because I this. On the third day I was fed. A plate of lentils and rice was dropped four feet away from me, much of it spilling on the floor. My hands were not untied.

  2. To what extent was Stalin to blame for the Berlin crisis 1948-9?

    and instituted a blockade on West Berlin, attempting "to force the Western powers to accept a German settlement more to their liking''10, however Miscamble goes onto argue that other events had greater significance, in particular the actions of Stalin. McCauley argues the "inept piece of diplomacy'' attempted by the Soviets

  1. How far was the USSR responsible for the outbreak of the Cold War?

    However, at Yalta, he did promise that free elections would be held in Poland and that some members of the London government would join the Lublin government. Yet, this "liberation" never actually came about in the way the Americans expected, as many accused the USSR of rigging the "free elections"

  2. Why did the Central Powers lose the First World War?

    There were different types of gas attacks and they were always on the improve, they can kill, blind or maim the enemy. There were different ways to attack using gas, the armies can let it drift with the wind (which always had a chance of changing wind direction and affecting the attacker)

  1. To what extent were germany to blame for the outbreak of ww1

    which Prussia was the most powerful, and In 1870 Prussian statesman Bismarck won a war against France. This was the start of a new and powerful German Empire: Germany took from France the important industrial area of Alsace Lorraine. The new Germany was successful in industry and by 1914 its

  2. Why did Mao Zedong introduce a second five year plan in 1958 and to ...

    group of local of local leaders was produced, who spearheaded future change. The reform was achieved with little bloodshed and on the whole benefited the poor. Basically the communist party offered fair taxes, fair distribution of wealth. Mao, in 1953, went on to devise the first five year plan with the help of Russian advisers.

  1. To what extent did the foreign intervention influence the outcome of the Spanish Civil ...

    benefits and paid holidays, as well as attempts to reduce the top-heavy officer corps of the army through early retirement and with the 1931 constitution, he abolished the nobility and with Article 26, he was able to take extensive measures against the Church.

  2. In what ways did World War one impact American society?

    This, combined with the still held viewpoint that was held by many women as well as men that women should remain at home resulted in less change than many anticipated until the large scale automation of domestic tasks later on in the twenties.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work