• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Spanish Republic and the civil war 1931-1939.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Tracie Narayanasamy SL 241 Maggie Torres Life and Death of Spain's Second Republic Coursework 2 Analytical Exercise Gabriel Jackson: The Spanish Republic and the Civil War 1931-1939 Tragically in 1939, after three years of bitter civil war and with the loss of around 750,000 Spanish lives, Spain fell to the rule of a Fascist dictatorship that was to last for almost four decades. The Spanish tragedy has been told and analysed by countless historians, and of these works Gabriel Jackson's The Spanish Republic and the Civil War 1931-1939 is widely referred to as the definitive liberal history of the Spanish Republic. Jackson begins with an outline of the nineteenth century monarchical and political upheavals that preceded the birth of the Spanish republic in 1931. From there, we are given a detailed account of events leading to Franco's final victory in 1939 and finally a synopsis which attempts to address some of the criticisms that have been levelled at Jackson's depiction. One such criticism is that Jackson leaves a crucial part of the story untold, namely that of the struggle of workers and peasants against not just the nationalist forces, but too against the conditions of capitalism and semi-feudalism. ...read more.

Middle

"Russia is a totalitarian regime...the frame of mind its leaders ...is cynical and opportunist. To expect such men to lead a social revolution in Spain, where the wildest idealism is combined with great independence of character, was out of the question."7 Political purges and show trials in the Soviet Union in 1934-36 had seen potential political opposition to Stalin brutally removed, many being accused, as was Leon Trotsky, of having been in league with Hitler. Russia was then a country "with a revolutionary past, not a revolutionary present."8 Stalin's main aim in 1936 was to ward off any threat from Hitler's Germany, by allying himself with Britain and France. Accordingly, a proletarian revolution in Spain could not be allowed to succeed, bringing as it would a threat of instability to ruling classes the world over, and a shift in the balance of European power. Communist policy as regards Spain then was one of subordinating "their [PCE] national policies to the USSR's supposed international interests."9 In effect this meant the defence of all legitimate middle-class authority at the expense the grass root militancy that could have helped avert the tragic outcome to Spain's civil war. ...read more.

Conclusion

The first mistaken belief is, as Chomsky points out, entirely in keeping with the "American Cold War mythology that has invented an "international Communist conspiracy" directed from Moscow ... to justify its own interventionist policies."21 The two beliefs together lead him to significantly underplay the destructive role played by Communist policy in Spain, which, while not wholly to blame for the Fascist victory, significantly dented the workers' will to fight. Many theorists have argued that only a successful revolution could have ultimately beaten the fascists, and that an early arming of workers could have averted three years of carnage. However, "We weren't being armed because the Republican authorities were more frightened of the working class than off the military." (Francisco Cabrera, Communist Youth, Seville) Communist insistence on an exclusively Popular Front, petty bourgeois programme was disastrous, which ultimately undermined the fight against Fascism. The loss of the Civil War in Spain to the fascists was more than just a military defeat, as in the words of Ronald Fraser, "For the objective was not only to castigate the defeated but to crush for all time working class militancy and the threat of socialist revolution, so that Spanish capitalism could prosper. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. To what extent did the foreign intervention influence the outcome of the Spanish Civil ...

    During the Civil War, the Church divided into two parts, where the lower clergy supported the Republicans and the higher clergy supported the Nationalists. The lower clergy supported the Republicans mainly because they wanted to preserve democracy and for social reasons.

  2. Moon Landing: Conspiracy or Reality?

    the astronauts to remain under the belt when in Earth orbit and then pass through it quickly. In this way the astronauts were exposed to the radiation for a short time, and they did not receive a dose considered dangerous (Ster).

  1. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    what possibilities existed for harnessing the incalculable energy of the atom for the purpose of international peace and cooperation rather than destruction. No issue, ultimately, would be more important for human survival. On the other hand, the very nature of having to build the A-bomb in a world threatened by

  2. The Spanish Civil War

    Franco also publicly kissed the Monarchist red and yellow flag at a rally in Seville in August 1936 at the Feast of the Assumption, thus appealing to the monarchists, it was at this speech that the movement first started to be portrayed as a 'holy crusade' rather than solely a political struggle.

  1. UNIT 6: PAPER 6b: THE SOVIET UNION AFTER LENIN

    * Because grain procurements were so high, income for peasants on the collectives were very low, reducing the incentive to work. Many spent more time on their private plots - by the end of the 1930s these were producing most of the country's eggs, milk and meat - than on their official duties.

  2. What were the causes and consequences of Italy's involvement in the Spanish Civil War?

    was carried out suddenly despite promises from Hitler that they would be warned in advance. Italy was also na�ve in its dealings with Germany during the Spanish Civil War as Hitler convinced Mussolini that considering Italy would reap the most benefits they should be the country to fund the majority of the war.

  1. Was the civil warinevitable?

    Both of these events overturned the previous Missouri compromise and thus once again brought the two opposing nations head to head. The Wilmot proviso bill which proposed to eliminate slavery in the territories was a clear signal to the South that the North was plotting against her way of life.

  2. Why was there a revolution in Feburary 1917?

    On the other hand, the provisional Government did not take any major decisions, such as to end Russia's involvement in the war, which many Russians expected them to do. Unable to command, the government could not appeal to a war weary, impatient people.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work