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To what extent can the growing involvement of the US in Vietnam in the years 1950 -1968, be seen as an ideological crusade against communism?

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Introduction

To what extent can the growing involvement of the US in Vietnam in the years 1950 -1968, be seen as an ideological crusade against communism? The growing involvement of the US in Vietnam in the years 1950 - 1969 can be seen due to a number of reasons. This includes: ideological crusade; French withdrawal; Geneva accords and weaknesses of South Vietnam. Although these reasons may have caused the US to intervene, it can be argued that the main reason for the growing involvement was due to ideological crusade against communism. The following will analyse why this brought about the growing involvement. Ideology was the main reason why the US government intervened in Vietnam. This is because they felt as if they were defending democracy and pride as the US felt threatened by the advance of communism. The communist invasion of the south came at a time when the US government were threatened by the Soviet Union and which prevented their attempts to contain communism. ...read more.

Middle

This factor is less important than the previous factor because it displays that the French cannot defend pride and democracy thus it leaves the US with no choice other than to intervene. Another reason for the growing involvement is due to the Geneva accords of 1954. This arranged a ceasefire in Vietnam after the French withdrawal. It declared that Vietnam was to be divided along the 17th parallel and democratic elections will be held in 1956 to unify the country. Although this declared that the South and North Vietnam were not to form any military alliances with foreign powers and not to allow foreign military bases in their territory, America still got involved. This was because it was clear from the defeat of the French that communist had a strong hold in the north of Vietnam. Therefore US didn't want elections to be held in 1956 to unify the country because they knew that Ho Chi Minh would win the elections. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was clear evidence that Diem would not be able 2 defend the ideological crusade on his own but required American involvement. Thus USA gave $250 million in 1956 and creasing sums the next few years. This factor is less important than the previous factors because the reason why America got involved is because of ideological crusade and therefore if USA did nothing then the weaknesses of the southern regime would enable communist to emerge victorious and threaten democracy. In conclusion the growing involvement of the US in Vietnam in the years 1950-1968 was due to a combination of factors but the main factor being ideological crusade. This is because the ideological crusade confirmed American involvement when problems. In addition successive presidents viewed the world through a cold war perspective that made a communist victory in Vietnam seem very significant. In addition the presidents believed that a communist Vietnam would affect the world balance of power in favour of communism and cause other Southeast Asian countries to fall to communism. Some would argue that American motivation was primarily ideological. Others would say that power and greed were equally important. ...read more.

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