• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent was Federal government responsible for improving the status of black people in the US in the years 1945-55?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐To what extent was federal government responsible from improving the status of black people in the US in the years 1945-55? The status of black people living in America had changed incredibly in the years 1945-55. This is because of the different presidents, congress, and the Supreme Court. Although I believe that the federal government was highly responsible for improving the status of black people in the years 1945-55, this essay will also be examining other factors that may have helped; factors such as Martin Luther King, other groups, and the media. To a certain extent, the Supreme Court played a considerable part in improving the status of black people in the US in the years 1945-55. For example, court cases such as Brown vs Topeka (1954), Browder vs Gayle (1956), and Morgan vs Virgina (1946) ...read more.

Middle

However, although the Supreme Court ruling in the case of Brown vs Topeka was a landmark decision that marked an end to the doctrine of ?separate but equal?, enforcing the decision proved to be very difficult. Not only did middle class whites set up the White Citizens? Councils to demand that segregation continued in local schools(by 1956 250,000 people had joined the White citizens? Councils), but councils campaigned for the election of local politicians who were strongly opposed to desegregation, there was a revival in the activity of the KKK, and Senator Harry Byrd called on Southerners to put up ?massive resisatnce? and in 1956 led 101 Southern Congressmen who signed the ?Southern Manifesto). This is a reason for why the Supreme Court perhaps didn?t considerably change the status of black people. ...read more.

Conclusion

When the voting rights bill was introduced to congress by Eisenhower, Democratic opponents filibusted the bill which significantly weakened it, and even though the second voting rights bill passed, it was still too weak and therefore ineffective. Black voting only increased by 3%. If Truman had gotten more support then he would have been able to achieve everything in his report ?To secure these rights?, and he would have been able to tackle lynching issues, police brutality, voting rights, discrimination in the armed forces, employment and education and radical discrimination in the area of health. This is why Congress didn?t improve the status of black people, because without sufficient support then the presidents cannot help to improve their status. However, Congress did help improve the status of black people in some aspects. The 3rd civil rights bill is one of the examples. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    As previously mentioned, this prompted Franklin D Roosevelt to issue an executive order to ban segregation within federal employment - and this included within the armed forces.

  2. Comparison of Presidents Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower and Lyndon Johnson

    contacts with many individual people who were suffering from segregation, symbolizing that he did not believe he was above them like many other white Americans did. Eisenhower was the first president to ever meet in the White House with black Civil Rights leaders. He invited Martin Luther King, Jr., A.

  1. Revision notes - the USA 1945 to 1980

    The House Un-American Activities Committee, was a government body which had the right o investigate anyone suspected of being a communist. Hoover told the committee that he knew many prominent people in American life were communists. He picked on Hollywood actors and producers, and the HUAC called them to give evidence.

  2. Linguistic Study - Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream', and ...

    He tells them 'somehow this situation can and will be changed'. This is very definite language, using verbs such as 'can' and 'will'. This again reassures the audience, as they trust and respect him. Change of Tone 'I Have a Dream...'

  1. Discuss the influences on Malcolm X and how they helped form his ideology in ...

    It was a Black Nationalist and a Black Separatist movement. Malcolm had helped to transform the minuscule NOI of 400 members to a mass organisation with members numbering tens of thousands, not mentioning the sympathisers.12 Breitman has a contrasting perspective.

  2. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    Influenced by writings of MX (& Che Guevara & Mao Tse-Tung) 3. Ideas based on revolutionary nationalism & self-defence. Black paramilitary uniform. 4. Campaigned for .. self-determination, full employment, decent housing, end to exploitation, exemption from military service, end to police brutality, reparations to black Americans as compensation for slavery, black jury to trial blacks (b)

  1. How accurate is it to say there was significant progress towards racial inequality in ...

    and departments set up in 1949 which were consequently proposed to congress. One main section would be the ?Fair Deal? program. This initiative aimed to tackle fundamental economic inequalities. Evidence suggests that segregation was accentuated by literal segregation of communities.

  2. In the context of the years 1865 to 1969, to what extent was Federal ...

    Civil Legislation by Congress outweighed any State Laws which had been put in place through the Supremacy Clause. A number of major pieces of Federal Legislation in favour of Blacks came into force during the mid 1860s. Declared the ?Death of Slavery?[1], the13th Amendment of the United States Constitution was

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work