• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How effectively does Gary Kilworth convey his Ideas on law and justice in his story Murderers Walk?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How effectively does Gary Kilworth convey his Ideas on law and justice in his story Murderers Walk? In the story murderers walk, Gary Kilworth conveys his ideas on law and justice very effectively by using narrative voice, narrative structure, setting, use of language, plot and characterisation. The central premise of this story is that natural justice should and will always prevail. The plot of this story is a game. You are introduced in the exposition to murderers walk, a free city state with no law. Kilworth explains about the elated feelings of criminals that have escaped the law, which leads on to an explanation of the game they play in the inns. Groups of nine murderers play a card game to decide their own death sentences. The loser, the player receiving the ace of spades must commit suicide within 24 hours. We are introduced to our main character that remains nameless throughout. He is a newcomer, who begins to play the game to feel that rush of adrenaline at escaping death again. We reach the climax as he loses. 24 hours of pure hell, thinking about death, before his life is over. Then denouement, just before death another player enters with two jokers and the game is declared void. ...read more.

Middle

During the whole of Murderers Walk there is no mention of dates or times. There is a mention of cobbled streets and old houses that overhang the alleys which suggests it may be set in Tudor or Stuart times but then there are still many streets now that have Tudor/Stuart buildings in them so it is quite possible it could be set anytime. It is like the place has been frozen in time. Because it's a lawless place it doesn't keep up with everyone else's time, it's a law unto itself. This emphasises the eeireness and the feelings of terror and fear. This shows Kilworths view of the law and its failings. It can't control everything, and it never will, nature will always be a law unto itself eventually. Kilworths uses powerful language to great effect. He uses strong words to create powerful images, for example "the pallor of your distended face: purple perhaps? Your eyes, huge balls easing out of their sockets? Your tongue hanging long between blue lips? You weep. Your head is full of a thousand active thoughts, each one a nightmare." These words create a powerful atmosphere of fear. Showing how natural justice can be just as bad, worse even than human laws. ...read more.

Conclusion

The place is empty of emotions yet at the same time full of them. The limited usage of characterisation makes the place seem hostile and uncaring which simply re-emphasises that natural justice is just as bad as human law and that justice will always prevail. Gary Kilworth conveys his ideas on law and justice effectively from the beginning to the end of the story. He uses many words throughout Murderers Walk relating to law and justice, such as execution, guilt and death. He uses narrative voice in an unconventional way. He directly involves the reader by using second person, drawing them into the dark, dank, terrifying underworld of criminals. He structures the story like the rules of game, like societies rules, except they've created their own. He creates a hostile setting which is very effective in proving his point that natural justice can be worse than government law. He effectively puts across that natural justice will prevail. He blends a mix of menacing pictures and dark meanings to show everything resolves itself in the end. Although the justice is very unconventional, the criminals in the story get what they really deserve in many ways. Their torment forces them to try and cheat death until they are released by death. So in Murderers walk, Kilworth shows an innovative and effective way to show that justice finds its own way in the end. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Machinery of Justice section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Machinery of Justice essays

  1. Critically analyse the relationship between law and justice.

    The rule states that "no man is above the law" and the government itself is subject to law and is required to conduct its activities in accordance with established principles of law rather than arbitrary or discretionary means. However, this does not coincide with the doctrine of sovereignty of Parliament.

  2. "If the Constitution is the source of governmental power, and the judiciary interprets the ...

    Congress has several options open to it after a decision has been made. Its first and most ;powerful; weapon is the amendment of the constitution. The Thirteenth Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments In Pollock v Farmers Loan Trust (1895) the court ruled that federal income taxes were illegal.

  1. Court Structure

    Indictable-only offence. Theses are serious crimes that must be tried in the Crown Court such as manslaughter, rape and treason. Defendants under 18 will generally be tried at a Youth Court but there are some exceptions. 3. Offences triable either way. These offences may be tried in either court.

  2. The Canadian Justice system towards aboriginal offenders

    The discrepancies between aboriginal and Euro- Canadian conceptions of justice reveal that a system which strives to exclusively punish the offender while minimizing community involvement is unlikely to curb aboriginal criminality. The sentencing provisions utilized in the Canadian criminal justice system provide no deterrence for aboriginal offenders as punishment is

  1. In the three stories "A Vendetta" by Guy De Maupassant, "Crackling Day" by world's ...

    In this short story the two main characters are young, black boys: Andries and his friend, whose name is not stated and which was the witness of all events that happened in the story; the plot is a recount of one day in the protagonist's life.

  2. "Examine why sexual offenders attract so much attention these days. How has the Criminal ...

    A key example being the case of Sidney Cooke, a convicted paedophile who operated a huge paedophile ring, in which they kidnapped, raped and killed children. Sidney Cooke was a known serial sex offender, however he was repeatedly released from prison into the community and once free continued to commit further sexual offences (BBC News, 1999).

  1. Should Justice be the Supreme Virtue of Societies

    They do this because they realise that if everybody gives equally (i.e. everything) then nobody loses anything, as the state (which is constituted by the individuals) possesses all things. From here on it is possible to provide protection by the state, and those objects that were once possessions now become property.

  2. Expert Testimony and Its Value In the Justice System

    This is a difficult question to answer as no matter which field it is that the jury requires advising on, there will be experts with vastly varying degrees of experience and knowledge within that field. It was stated in R v Silverlock[12] that ?No one should be allowed to give

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work