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Factors influencing girls athletic performance throughout secondary school.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction






















image00.pngimage01.pngimage02.png

Introduction

Athletics data has been collected for a number of years at Colchester County High School.

Colchester County High School is a selective school for girls in the Colchester district.  This means that it is not representative of the whole population.  Upon entry to the school, forms are chosen on the basis of musical, sporting and academic talent from previous years in primary school.  This means, that in theory, all the forms that are the outcome of one selective test should be equal in sporting ability.  

However, this is not to say that they would be equal in athletic activity, as in primary school, most pupils play sports such as netball, hockey, tennis and rounders.  Even primary schools that do some athletics do more common things like the 100m run, and long jump.  Most primary schools do not teach the athletic events such as 1500m or discus.  Girls that are good at sport are not necessarily good at athletics, and vice versa.  Also, girls whose schools do teach athletics are clearly priveliged.

This data is available to the pupils through the maths and sports departments.  The data includes times for running various distances and distances for long jump high jump and triple jump.  The data also includes distances that the girls can throw the rounders ball, discus and shot.

This data is to be treated as though it were primary data, as it is from a reliable source.  The physical education staff record the data, and sometimes the data is collected by the pupils themselves.  

Although the data is from a reliable source, it is essential to recognise that human error can be a factor in this data.  The data could have been “measured” inaccurately or recorded mistakenly.

...read more.

Middle

                        n

This shows how the data is spread in relation to the mean.

(2.15 – 2.70)2 + (2.16 – 2.70)2 + (2.17 – 2.70)2 etc.

                                  74

        =   0.3025 + 0.2916 + 0.2809 etc.

                                74

                = 37.89871

                        74

                = 0.512145m

The mean and standard deviation are in metres and have been rounded to three decimal places for ease.  The standard deviations show that the data for year 8 is the most widely spread and the data for year 9 is the closest together.  

The highest mean is for year 9 and the smallest standard deviation is also for year 9.  This means that year 9 peaked in long jump.  This may not be true for all the girls shown in the histograms or even for all girls, but the general population.  

The lowest mean was for year 7, but this did not have the highest standard deviation.  Year 8 has the highest standard deviation.  Both year 7 and 8 have fairly similar performances (2.70m and 2.78m).  This shows that their jumping ability did not really improve in these years.  This seems quite likely, as there is only one hour lesson in a year for long jump for the girls to perform in, and you can not expect girls to improve so much then.

The histograms are also fairly similar for year 9 and year 10, but year 9’s results are a little better, as they are more negatively skewed.  This also shows that the performance that peaked in year 9 slowly decreases in year 10.

Year 7

Class

Frequency

Class Width

Frequency Density

1.25  l  2.0

4

0.75

5.3

2.0  l  2.4

13

0.4

32.5

2.4  l  3.0

27

0.6

45

3.0  l  3.5

26

0.5

52

3.5  l  4.1

3

0.6

5

4.1 l 4.6

1

0.5

2

SD

0.512145

MEAN

2.783243

Year 8

Class

Frequency

Class Width

Frequency Density

1.25  l  2.0

4

0.75

5.3

2.0  l  2.4

11

0.4

27.5

2.4  l  3.0

26

0.6

43.3

3.0  l  3.5

28

0.5

56

3.5  l  4.1

6

0.6

10

4.1 l 4.6

1

0.5

2

SD

0.561594

MEAN

2.860395

Year 9

Class

Frequency

Class Width

Frequency Density

1.25  l  2.0

3

0.75

4

2.0  l  2.4

5

0.4

12.5

2.4  l  3.0

25

0.6

41.67

3.0  l  3.5

29

0.5

58

3.5  l  4.1

9

0.6

15

4.1 l 4.6

1

0.5

2

SD

0.491349

MEAN

2.9876

Year 10

Class

Frequency

Class Width

Frequency Density

1.25  l  2.0

2

0.75

2.67

2.0  l  2.4

10

0.4

25

2.4  l  3.0

23

0.6

38.3

3.0  l  3.5

26

0.5

52

3.5  l  4.1

11

0.6

18.3

4.1 l 4.6

2

0.5

4

SD

0.543238

MEAN

2.951216

...read more.

Conclusion

This hypothesis, like my last one suggests that the athletic peak for a pupil be during year 9.  This may be biased for the dozens of reasons outlined in the introduction.  We have no idea how the results would vary in a non-selective mixed school, non-selective boys/girls schools; selective mixed school or a selective boy’s school.  It would also differ greatly from a school that focused more on sport.  

One of the logical reasons for why the athletic peak may be in year 9, is that apart from year 10s, they are the eldest, and the Year 10s are under so much more pressure due to GCSE work, leaving less time for sport, etc.

It also possibly means that year 10s cannot concentrate as much when they are doing athletics because of the pressure of coursework.  It is also possible that this year is not representative of other years that may continue getting better.  There is however, only a certain amount that a teenager can improve before they reach the best of their ability and can only stay the same or get worse.  This was referred to as the “peak” and achieved by most in CCHS during year 9.

...read more.

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