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Moore's documentary is a one-way mirror

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Introduction

Moore's documentary is a one-way mirror It is true, "Moore's documentary is a one-way mirror". He directs viewers to a particular point of view through the techniques of information selection, juxtaposition and in-depth arguments. This essay will illustrate how Moore supports his point of view by utilising three suggestive arguments, "the availability of guns in America causes a high yearly death rate", "banning guns and ammunition will lead to less killings" and "ammunition can be bought in mass quantities without any restrictions whatsoever". Moore's documentary is a one-way mirror through the technique of information selection. This conveys the argument that the availability of guns in America causes a high yearly death rate. Viewers are shown figures relating to the number of gun related murders in various countries. Several miniscule numbers flash momentarily. The American stat is shown last to emphasise the colossal difference between its cases and several other developed nations. In contrast to the other figures, the amount of cases in America (11127) ...read more.

Middle

Those that do have guns, use theirs for recreational purposes like shooting animals. Unlike the Americans, Canadians do not use guns as a means of protection. Through this, it is clear that Moore uses juxtaposition to illustrate the distinct differences between the nations and portray his argument that a ban on guns and ammunition will lead to less killings. It is a fact that there are very few gun murders in Canada's history since they limited their number of guns. Moore interviews other Canadians where they tell him that they cannot remember the last time there was a gun murder. He further puts forward his point of view on this particular argument by stating "they (Canada) have so few murders because they have so few guns". In America however, it is almost a routine to hear on the news that someone has been shot dead as a result of a gun. Moore successfully juxtaposes the differences in the two societies to much success and is quite suggestive of the path in which Americans should take; to ban guns altogether, like the Canadians. ...read more.

Conclusion

They then all returned back to the other K-mart store with the media to demonstrate how easy it was to get a hold of a mass number of ammunition. Through these acts, Moore backs up his views on ammunition sales in stores and its availability through the technique of in-depth arguments and the support of factual evidence. He demonstrates that ammunition can be bought in mass quantities without any restrictions whatsoever and therefore something must be done about this in America throughout all stores. Through Moore's documentary, we look through a one-way mirror. That is, a one dimensional view regarding several different aspects relating to guns through Moore's arguments. They are - the availability of guns in America causes a high yearly death rate, banning guns and ammunition will lead to less killings and ammunition can be bought in mass quantities without any restrictions whatsoever. I feel this documentary has demonstrated a powerful view on the aspects of guns and should be commended for its attention to detail and extravagant planning. Bowling for Columbine is simply the fine line in American society between reality and insanity. ...read more.

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