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Federalism vs. Devolution

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Introduction

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Middle

Constitution given to the federal government are left to the state to be decided upon, such as drinking ages and so forth. The history of these to governmental systems are key in understanding how they are structured and enforced. In the case of the USA, the Founding Fathers were fearful of a tyrannical ruler living and dictating from the centre of a strong government; the constitutional compromise of federalism resulted in the government being strong enough to resist attack. Other gradual changes that led to federalism were things such as the growth in population and westward expansion across the continent. Furthermore, improvements in communication and key issues being foreign policy and world power became more central when forming the government. Federalism in the US itself has evolved over time, beginning with Dual Federalism (roughly 1780 s to 1920 s) whereby the power between the state and federal governments was equal and balanced. Following this was Cooperative Federalism, running until the 1960 s, a time when the federal governmbly. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the European Parliament does detract from the unitary state s parliamentary sovereignty, as European law is higher than any other law in Europe. The statement claiming that the devolution of power in the UK has brought it closer to US style federalism could be considered accurate when considering the powers that Scottish and Welsh assemblies have, striking similarities to the state and national power sharing in America. Furthermore, it could also be considered accurate when the European Parliament is taken into account, as the power that this has is greater than that of the central government in the UK. However, the unitary state means that the central government still has the power to take away devolved powers at its discretion, reducing the accuracy of the statement saying it is becoming more federal. an Army were to decommission all weapons, but when it was found that this had not bee1/43/4 �$�$ ,,L1N1P1R1T1V1�������������1/4"1/4"(2�"'(� %<( KxP ,12�"'(� �) @�S 1 1 J1L1N1P1R1T1V1��1/4�1/4�1/4 "$� 08$� 08&$� 08 �$TSH����B�$TSH:. "�" $����� "ttV12V14J �$ONT,Times New Roman Trebuchet MS�� " " "F�� �"�"�Ä" 'S "wy"�` "�`""A."@���"�"�" 'S "wy"�` "�`"."-"Ks"�#�"gi"gi c�� �����Z� ��� �O�2�Quill96 Story Group Class�����9�q ...read more.

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