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Socialists no longer seek to fundamentally change society.

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Introduction

"Socialists no longer seek to fundamentally change society" Many Socialists have believed that Socialism could only be introduced by overthrowing the current political system. Blanqui proposed to do it through a small band of conspirators. Marx and Engels however, saw a proletarian revolution in which the masses of the working class would overthrow the bourgeoisie. This view arose from a growing dislike of Capitalism; industrialization having produced an injustice geared towards the working classes with widespread poverty and unemployment. Moreover, the proletariat did not have a political voice to represent them, as the majority of workers could not vote. These socialists saw that the state in an effort to act in the favour of capital and negated the needs of the Labour. Thus, people like Marx said that revolution was unavoidable to instate Socialism. The context of these theories was unsettled with many discontent in the lower classes during the 19th century. ...read more.

Middle

Bernstein was one writer on this concept and argued this case by suggesting that the Capitalist Bourgeoisie's new adherence to democracy would open the door to socialist influence. He noted the appearance of new factory legislation, the freeing of trade unions and co-operative trading as well as standard conditions for Labour in the work place. He saw these as characteristics of change that would lead to continued evolution. The biggest problem with the socialist link to democracy was quite broadly; should socialists participate in Bourgeoisie governments and in doing so is it not giving a form of approval. Revolutionists tend to answer that it would. Early on there was no question; the Bourgeoisie was the enemy, however now evolutionary socialists are more often considered as being pragmatic in pressing forward their ideas. Literally, what ever ever works approach as opposed to a steadfast revolutionary option. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now, although not all socialists would agree, a lot are happy to play the system especially as the majority of concepts have been recognized as good and incorporated into the modern systems. The Socialist fight today is less war and violent revolt for the majority of socialists but a fight against the exceptional advance of capitalism. In modern times, the global market has come together and multi-national super companies have emerged. Socialists who are into direct action might protest against figureheads of this new super capitalism like the world trade organization or huge companies. Others, who are willing to use the democratic systems, might try to reduce it through pressure groups, Microsoft is currently being challenged and is an example of governments not destroying the huge companies but keeping them in check. A socialist today will still have strong arguments for change but maybe the majority will agree that no earth shattering change through revolt is needed in any real of immediacy, especially concerning countries in the E.U. ...read more.

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