• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe the biological (medical) model of abnormality and evaluate it in terms of its strengths and weaknesses. (12 marks)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Describe the biological (medical) model of abnormality and evaluate it in terms of its strengths and weaknesses. (12 marks) The biological model of abnormality assumes that there is an underlining physiological cause of psychological disorders. Such disorders are considered as illness in the same way as the body can be affected by illnesses. The model includes the idea that genetic factors may be important in psychological disorders. As identical twins are 100% genetically identical and fraternal twins don?t share all of their genes, identical twins might be more similar if a condition is inherited. ...read more.

Middle

Evidence for this includes the effects of drugs such as amphetamines, which increase dopamine levels and can result in behaviour similar to schizophrenia. However, an alternative explanation is that people with schizophrenia are more sensitive to dopamine, rather than they have more of the chemical. Because the medical model assumes there is a physical cause of abnormality, it uses physical treatments. These include drug therapy, electro-convulsive therapy (which is sometimes used in very severe depression) and psychosurgery such as prefrontal lobotomies. One strength is that there is evidence supporting the view that there are physical causes underlying some psychological disorders. ...read more.

Conclusion

They may also have serious side effects. Another weakness of the medical model is that there are ethical issues raised by the use of treatments like ECT. It may be difficult to gain informed consent for treatment from someone with a psychological problem, especially if they don?t have insight into the condition. In conclusion, the medical model has provided evidence that there may be underlying physical causes of psychological disorders. The treatments derived from the approach are often effective, but can have unpleasant side effects and don?t provide a cure. However, despite its weaknesses, the strengths of the model have maintained its popularity. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Physiological Psychology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Physiological Psychology essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Outline and evaluate the biological approach to abnormality (12 marks)

    3 star(s)

    Neurochemistry refers to the function and availability of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, GABA, serotonin and noradrenalin. Dependent on the area of the brain they occur in, each affect behaviour in a different want.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Outline and Evaluate the biological model to Abnormality.

    5 star(s)

    This can be seen with Alzheimer's disease, a type of dementia caused by loss of cells in a number of areas in the CNS. Although there is heavy research supporting the biological model to abnormality, there are also limitations to this model.

  1. Anxiety Disorders

    precursor for a phobia, which may or may not be at the conscious level. Symptoms Symptoms include either extreme anxiety and fear associated with the object or situation or avoidance. To be diagnosed, the symptoms must be disruptive to everyday functioning (such as quitting a great job merely because you have to use an elevator).

  2. Give a brief account of the biological (medical) model of abnormality and consider its ...

    It is also a positive from an ethical point of view as it removes societies 'blame' placed on the patient. There are also problems and limitations with this model, as it raises the question of whether mental illness is the same as physical illness.

  1. What treatments are available for schizophrenia and are they effective?

    to be hospitalised for years, with most being able to live in the community. This means that there is more hospital space available for the use of other illnesses, and that the schizophrenia sufferer is able to live a comparatively normal life at home.

  2. Sleep and Biological Rhythms revision

    Fact that it is universal w/ particular differences suggests both theories Lifespan changes in sleep Infants - * Sleep for 2/3 of day, but not continuous - suggested to be adaptive mechanism for parents to do every day activities + wouldn't wake if hungry or cold * As they mature, a circadian rhythm is est.

  1. Insomnia its affects and its treatments.

    The effective management of these sleep difficulties rests upon the medical or psychiatric condition. However, behavioral methods and sleeping pills could be used if appropriate. Depression is the one syndrome of insomnia that psychologists analyze most commonly. A depressive "episode" is usually accompanied by a characteristic set of changes to sleep patterns.

  2. Discuss Biological Therapies for Depression.

    swimming, as they may fear that if the swim something bad may happen to them. Another ethical issue raised by the use of ECT to treat depression is consent. The department of health found that out of 700 patients who received ECT when they were sectioned- 59% of them hadn?t consent to the treatment.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work