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I am to provide some fun activities for a group of children to extend their all round development. But in particle to develop their understanding of science.

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Introduction

Unit 2 work with Young Children Key Stage 1 plan Aim I am to provide some fun activities for a group of children to extend their all round development. But in particle to develop their understanding of science. Setting The primary school in which I am working, is situated on a campus with a sports centre, a community school and a 6th form college. It has 6 junior classes and 3 infant classes. There is a class room assistant and a teacher for each class. On Thursday and Friday there are 2 students working in the infants. There are a various number of parent helpers visiting on different days of the week. During the course of the day there are 3 sessions 09:00-10:30 Session 1 10:45-11:30 Session 2 12:45-02:00 Session 3 02:15-03:15 Session 1 is usually literacy, session 2 math and session 3 is class time used for science, humanities and other subjects. This is an afternoon break halfway though session 3. Sometimes the sessions are swapped around to give the children extra time to work if they need it. For example they sometimes swap math to session 3 to help with S.A.T.S. They are 15 yr.1 girls 14 yr.l boys 16 yr.2 girls and 15 yr.2 boys in class 1 / 2 K. The children change into appropriate classes for maths and literacy. It will be interesting to see how the children cope with my activities, Will they be confused and give up, or will they understand and be interested to lean more? Rationale for the key stage 1 plan Based around the topic of science I will do a key stage 1 plan to further the children's knowledge and understanding of science, the World around them and how it works. This plan will be implemented at my placement and used with the whole class. The age of the children I am working with is 5-7 yr. ...read more.

Middle

and one 15w light bulb in a series circuit. I will set up this circuit in the junior/infant corridor, on a table with 8 chairs, 8 sheets of lined paper and 8 pencils. I will collect the pencil's form the pencil pot and the paper from the draw by the window. Implementation I will set up a basic circuit with a break in (see diagram). When there is a break the bulb does not light, when a conductive item completes the circuit the bulb will light. There is a switch in the circuit so that when the children are swapping items over for saftey. The children will choose and test items from around the classroom to see if they conduct electricity. They can tell weather it is a conductor if it completes the circuit and the bulb lights up. They will do some predictions onto what will conduct once they have collected all the items to be tested. They will make a table of all the items they test and the results they receive. They will then write a conclusion of what happened in the experiment. During the activity the children picked 2 items each, and put them into groups. the groups consisted of items which were different materials. They determined what groups the items using colours, size, weight texture and flexibility as a guide to what they were made of. The children then tested these items using crocodile clips attached at each end of the item, if the bulb lights up the circuit is completed and the item is can conduct electricity. This is record and the children write up all their findings at the end of the experiment. An example of what the children wrote is included with this key stage one plan. I found that the children figured out, them selves though the process of elimination that most metals conduct electricity. ...read more.

Conclusion

Materials and their properties Sort materials into groups, using words to describe their properties such as 'shiny', 'hard' or 'smooth' describe how some materials change when, for example, they are heated, cooled, stretched or twisted. Physical processes Make a bulb light up using a simple circuit with a battery and a switch. The ee how this is similar to the lights and switches in their home compare the brightness or colour of lights, and the loudness or pitch of sounds describe moving objects by talking about speed and direction. Children look at and explore: "life processes and living things, such as familiar animals and plants materials and their properties, such as wood, paper and rock physical processes: simple ideas in physics, taught through experiences with electricity, forces, light and sounds." (pg 8, learning journey, key stage 1) Through work in these three areas children are taught about scientific enquiry. The teacher or children ask questions, then the children work together to try to answer the questions by finding things out and recording their work. They think about the tests and comparisons they have done and whether or not these are a fair way to help answer the questions. They find out more about scientific ideas from books and computer sources. And they write and draw (sometimes on computers), communicating their work and their results in scientific language, drawings, charts and tables. Contemporary theorists suggest that a better description of how children develop cognitively can be provided by approaches that do not employ concrete fixed stages. Research also has proven that children are not always consistent in their performance of tasks at each stage. Furthermore, developmental psychologists imply that cognitive development proceeds in a continuous fashion; they propose that such development is primarily quantitative, rather than qualitative. This is identified by Katherine Dilasion. Most developmental theorists have agreed that Piaget has provided us with an accurate account of age-related changes in cognitive development. Piaget's suggestion, that cognitive performance cannot be attained unless cognitive readiness is brought about by maturation and environmental stimulation, and has been instrumental in determining the structure of educational curriculum. ...read more.

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