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Explain how Jewish people put their beliefs about Israel/Zionism into action

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Introduction

Zionism A02 Question: Explain how Jewish people put their beliefs about Israel/Zionism into action (7 marks) Israel is very important to Jewish people because Jews believe that it is the land that God promised to the Jewish people and that he looks favourably upon it. It is one of the things Jews gain in return for keeping the covenant relationship with God. Jews also might have a preference to live in a Jewish state. Jewish people use the term "aliyah" which means "going up" when describing and talking about going to live in Israel. Traditionally Jews put their beliefs about Israel into action by joining a movement known as the Zionist movement. "Zion" is a word which is used for Jerusalem in the Old Testament but is often used to refer to the whole of Israel. ...read more.

Middle

However certain Jewish people including Yehudi hai Alkalai said Jews should prepare for the arrival of the messiah by populating Israel and hence the Zionist movement began. This was hard because Israel was under Turkish rule and had been Muslim for many centuries. They were not ready to make it a Jewish state at this stage. Yehudi was followed by Theodor Herzyl who believed that small groups of Jews settling in Jews was not enough and the persecution would not be over until Jews had a homeland i.e. land of their own. Herzyl got money off wealthy Jewish people and set up a society to buy land in Palestines so that wholesale settlement of Jewish people in Israel could start.Herzyl however had little success despite his efforts. After WW2 the UN separated Israel into separate Jewish and Arab states. ...read more.

Conclusion

Other Jewish people might not actually want to go and settle in Israel however, they will be sympathetic towards those who do. There are fund raising agencies all over the world who raise money to provide financial support for Jews who wish to live in Israel. A Jewish person who does not wish to live in Israel may donate money to one of these agencies as a way of helping and supporting someone who does and allowing them to carry out aliyah. Jewish people who do not wish to live in Israel may visit Israel on a regular basis to see relatives who perhaps live there or spend some time working on a kibbutz and it is very common for Jewish teenagers to spend a summer or a year living and working on a kibbutz. Jewish people may also go on a pilgrimage to Israel and visit the Western Wall and Yad Vashem. Some go to help the Israeli army. Fatema Merali 11M ...read more.

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