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An Experiment to find out whether temperature affects the rate at which a liver enzyme works

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Introduction

Assignment Two An Experiment to find out whether temperature affects the rate at which a liver enzyme works. Table of Results Amount of oxygen collected Tube number Temperature (c) First Go Second Go Second Go Average 1 10 6 6 7 6 2 20 12 10 10 11 3 30 16 28 14 19 4 40 26 24 30 27 5 50 5 7 6 6 60 0 0 0 I have produced a table of results, which includes all three results produced. Due to the fact that I have three separate results, I am going to compile an average by adding the three results together and dividing the sum by three, for each of the temperatures recorded. For temperatures 50�c, I will have to find the average of the two results because the third result was not obtained. In this case I will divide the sum by two. For temperatures 60�c, the amount of oxygen collected was 0cm� and the third result was not obtained, so my average for 60�c will be 0cm�. For my table of results I will draw a line graph to present the data as clearly as possible. ...read more.

Middle

Conclusion In drawing together a conclusion for the investigation of whether temperature affects the rate of reaction, we can see from the table of results and line-graph that when the temperature increases to a certain degree (50�c) the amount of oxygen collected increases. This is because kinetic energy within the particles increases, therefore more pairs of particles will have enough energy between them to collide successfully and break apart. Enzymes are biological catalysts. They are produced in all living organisms and control all the chemical reactions that occur. Enzymes are held by chemical bonds. If you increase the temperature, the chemical bonds begin to break in the molecule due to kinetic energy. This makes the enzyme lose its shape and structure, it then begins to denature. When the enzyme denatures it cannot perform the required instructions and dies. We can see this in the line-graph for 50�c. The amount of oxygen collected is 6cm�, which is hardly enough compared to the other amounts of oxygen collected for different temperatures. We can also see that temperature 10�c the amount of oxygen collected is 6cm� which is also very low. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is only one anomalous point (50�c), this is due to the fact that the enzyme denatured and no oxygen was being collected into the test tube. The experiment could have been more accurate by: * Keeping the temperature at a constant level. It could have been that the temperature went higher or lower than the required amount. * Making a more accurate reading on the measuring cylinder. * Placing the apparatus more correctly. The evidence is thus enough to draw a conclusion on whether 'temperature affects the rate at which a liver enzyme works,' enough to say that the best temperature for an enzyme to work 40�c and anything below that will be too slow and anything above will denature the enzyme. Overall the experiment was correct. However at the same time, more repetitions of the experiment would make the results even more reliable. Not only repetitions at one point in time but repetitions over a number of weeks to make sure those factors such as temperature, equipment and inaccurate readings do not interfere with the results. Repeating the experiment over time will take this into account. After having done the experiment a graph of means can be worked out bringing a pool of evidence together to draw a tight conclusion. ...read more.

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