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Finding out how much carbon dioxide can be found in different concentrations of yeast and glucose

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Introduction

BIOLOGY INVESTIGATION COURSEWORK >What we are trying to find out ?? this investigation is to do with, finding out how much carbon dioxide can be found in different concentrations of yeast and glucose. >The apparatus used - a pair of goggles - a burette - a beaker - a syringe - a large round plastic bowl - a glass tube - a rubber bung >PLAN The procedure consisted of my partner and I gathering suitable apparatus for the investigation. we then set the apparatus up to its ready state. Which involved filling the large round plastic bowl and the burette with water. after getting the sufficient amount of yeast and glucose solutions. We concentrated the appropriate solution for each test. Then added them to the appropriate beakers. For us to proceed with the investigation we needed to make it a fair test. first we had come to the agreement of timing the procedure to 6 minutes; and secondly we chose to keep the concentration of yeast the same throughout each of the experiments. ...read more.

Middle

This general definition includes virtually all chemical reactions of physiological importance, and scientists today often restrict the term to the action of specific enzymes, called ferments, produced by minute organisms such as moulds, bacteria, and yeast's. For example, lactase, a ferment produced by bacteria usually found in milk, causes the milk to sour by changing lactose (milk sugar) into lactic acid. Probably the most important type of fermentation is alcoholic fermentation, in which the action of zymase secreted by yeast converts simple sugars, such as glucose and fructose, into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide. Many other kinds of fermentation occur naturally, as in the formation of butanoic acid when butter becomes rancid and of ethanoic (acetic) acid when wine turns to vinegar. Generally, fermentation results in the breakdown of complex organic substances into simpler ones through the action of catalysis. For example, by the action of diastase, zymase, and invertase, starch is broken down (hydrolysed) ...read more.

Conclusion

My prediction fits into the trend of the graph. I stated that "when the concentration of glucose is 0ml that the amount of carbon dioxide will be extremely low". And as shown in the graph the last three results were 0.3, 0.4, and 0.2, which are low. Errors: this could happen if there is pressure in the glass tube before the experiment. Which would then cause a burst of air to rise up the burette and cause a major drop in the results. >what could be improved ?? The improvements that could be made to this investigation are: the beaker could be placed upon a form of vibrating plate to shake the solution and keep it flowing, this should then able the solution to release all the carbon dioxide. Another improvement that could be made is to replace the large round plastic bowl with a glass/plastic tank. These minor improvements could make the next investigation a bit more reliable and more accurate. By Adam Lenihan ...read more.

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