• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18

In this report I will start by exploring the history of the Computerised Tomography (CT) scanner and the technological advances which have made this type of medical imaging one of the most successful in its field. In addition, I will give a detailed expla

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Content Page

Page Title  Page Number

Aim………………………………………………………………………………….…2

History……………………………………………………………………...…...…...2-3

Principles and Components of CT.

Gantry…………………………………………………………………………….....4-5

X-ray tube……………………………………………………………………………...5

Three-phase generator……………………………………………………………........6

Gantry.

Collimator………………………………………………...………………………...….7

Filter………………………………………………………….…………..………….7-8

Detector……………………………………………………..……………………........8

Image formation.

Formation…………………………………..………………………………………….9

CT image…………………...……………………………………………...................10

Image reconstruction………….……………………….…………………….……10-11

Advances.

Advances and Slip Ring……….……………………….…………………………12-13

Helical Scanning……………………………...……...……………………….……...13

Applications, Advantages and Risks………………...……………….………..….14-15

Summary ……………...……...……………………….………………...……...……16

Bibliography…………………………………………………….………………..17-18

Aim:

In this report I will start by exploring the history of the Computerised Tomography (CT) scanner and the technological advances which have made this type of medical imaging one of the most successful in its field. In addition, I will give a detailed explanation of the physics used to generate and manipulate a three-dimensional image. These images are used by physicians to diagnose cancers and vascular diseases or identify other injuries within the skeletal system, which can cause millions of deaths each year.  

This area of research has been chosen because I plan to enter the world of medicine in the next academic year. Medicine is constantly changing and developing. Cost containment and limitations reimbursed for high-tech studies such as CT and Magnetic Resonance imagining (MRI) are part of the future for the health care system. For CT to grow, or at least survive, it must provide more information than other imaging modalities in a cost-effective, time-efficient manner and at this present time it is able to achieve its aim.  

History:

Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek words "tomos" meaning "slice" and “graphia” meaning "describing". The first CT scanner was invented in Britain by the EMI Medical Laboratories in 1973 and was designed by the engineer Godfrey N Hounsfield. Hounsfield was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contributions to medicine and science.  Figure 1.0 (below left) show the first ever CT scanner produced, with its designer Hounsfield:

Foster E. (1993)

...read more.

Middle

As the three separate coils are arranged 120° apart, the oscillations of each of these are 120° out phase. This means the purple (or neutral) wire can be quite thin since the different phases add up to approximately zero.image04.png

The potential difference generated needs to be high; high potential difference has a number of advantages in CT scanners. High potential difference reduces bone attenuation (greater penetration) allowing wider range of image (larger grey scale as bone is not merely white as on normal x-ray- (this will be explained later). In addition, the higher the radiation intensity at the detectors in the gantry, the better the information acquired.

Gantry:

The Collimator:

In this section we shall look at the gantry (figure 1.3) in more detail. Figure 1.6 shows a diagrammatic representation of the inside of a gantry. image58.png

According to Foster E (1993), inside the gantry is a beam restrictor called, collimator. Beam restrictors are lead obstacles placed near to the anode of the X-ray tube (figure 1.4) and are used to control the width of the X-ray beam allowed to pass through the patient. Beam restrictors are needed as they keep patient exposure to a minimum and also reduce scattered rays. This is very important as X-rays are produced by a centre spot on the anode; they are not all produced at the same point. In addition, restrictors also maintain beam width travelling through the patient, which as a result affects the image quality (stronger beam means better image). The most effective form of a beam restrictor is a collimator. This is situated in front of the X-ray tube and consists of two sets of four sliding lead shutters which move independently to restrict the beam.image05.png

The Filters:

image06.png

By looking at figure 1.6 we can see another apparatus positioned between the collimator and the X-ray tube.

...read more.

Conclusion

The websites I used are all recommended by The University of Hertfordshire to its undergraduates in radiography. This means they are also reliable sources of information. In addition, I also used a number of well recognised radiology books. By using different sources of information, I was able to eliminate any bias or inaccurate information provided in some sources.

To sum up, I believe the information provided is accurate and reliable.

Bibliography:

Book References

  • Allday J, Adams S (2000) Advanced Physics. Oxford University Press
  • Ball J, More D.A (2006) Essential Physics for Radiographers. Blackwell Publishing
  • Bushong C.S (2004) Radiologic Science for Technologist. Mosby Inc
  • Duncan T, (1987) Physics; A Textbook for Advanced Level Students. John Murray
  • Elliott A, McCormick A (2004) Health Physics. Cambridge University Press
  • Foster E (1993) Equipment for Diagnostic Radiographer. MTP Press Limited
  • Graham T.D (1996) Principles of Radiological Physics. Churchill Livingstone
  • Ogborn et al (2000) Advancing Physics A2. Institute of Physics
  • Roberts P.D, Smith L.N (1990) Radiographic Imaging. Churchill Livingstone
  • Thompson C, Wakeling J (2003) AS Level Physics. Coordinate Group Publication.

On Line References

  • Figure 1.0 obtained from, www.catscanman.net
  • Figure 1.1 obtained from, www.mh.org.au
  • Figure 1.3 and Figure 1.4 obtained from, www.impactscan.org/slides
  • Figure 1.5 obtained from, www.koehler.me.uk
  • Figure 1.6 and Figure 1.7 obtained from www.impactscan.org/slides
  • Figure 1.8 obtained from, www.itnonline.net
  • Figure 1.9 and Figure 2.0 obtained from www.sprawls.org/resources
  • Figure 2.1 obtained from, www.csmc.edu
  • Figure 2.2 and Figure 2.3 obtained from, www.sprawls.org/resources
  • Figure 2.4, Figure 2.5 and Figure 2.6 obtained from www.impactscan.org/slides
  • www.radiologyinfo.org (25 February 2009)
  • www.imaginis.com/ct-scan/ (12 March 2009)
  • www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2 (15 February 2009)
  • www.impactscan.org/slides (12 March 2009)
  • www.sprawls.org/resources (14 March 2009)

Other References

  • Synergy Magazine
  • New Scientist Magazine
  • Nature Magazine

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Basildon and Thurrock University hospital and the University of Hertfordshire for their support and information.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Mechanics & Radioactivity section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Mechanics & Radioactivity essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    AS OCR B Advancing Physics Coursework - Making Sense of Data

    4 star(s)

    9.81m/s-2 so there is a small amount of error within the data, also indicated by the slight difference in the two calculated acceleration values. I have decided to look a little more closely at the error involved in my calculations.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Are mobile phones a health risk?

    4 star(s)

    stripping electrons from, or in very high energy radiation, even break apart the nucleus of atoms [2] and as such can cause genetic malfunctions which can lead to cancers. What are the Possible Dangers of Mobile Phone EM Radiation? Cancer-Inducing Effects of Radiation Mobile phones use microwaves in order to transmit their information, and not UV, X or gamma rays.

  1. Peer reviewed

    The Physics of Windsurfing

    4 star(s)

    If we take this same instrument, and mount it on a boat that is moving through the water, then the readings will be show the speed and direction of the apparent wind relative to the boat If the true wind is blowing at 20 knots from the south and the

  2. Investigating the factors affecting tensile strength of human hair.

    The more melanin in your hair, the darker it will get. An amino acid called tyrosine is converted into melanin so the hair will have colour. First, the body's blood vessels carry tyrosine to the bottom of each hair follicle.

  1. Use of technology in a hospital radiology department. The department of imaging is one ...

    radiology examination of patients using a range of X-ray equipment, together with computer tomography, in this department there are radiologists which are a doctors specially trained to interpret the results and carry out some of the more complex examination, they are supported by radiographers who are highly trained to carry out many of the x ray and other imaging procedures.

  2. OCR B Advancing Physics Physics Practical Investigation Coursework Investigating Simple Harmonic Oscillations

    A spring with an attached mass was connected to a vibration generator, causing it to oscillate at frequencies selected using the signal generator. At a certain frequency, the driving force adds energy at just the right moment during the cycle so that the oscillation is reinforced and the spring oscillates with maximum amplitude.

  1. The physics involved with a rollercoaster.

    Similarly, when an elevator starts moving, you feel more weight on your legs (it's a vertical force). When a roller coaster car makes a hairpin turn, the acceleration may push you to the side, or up or down. Acceleration is measured in "g", where 1 g corresponds to the vertical acceleration force due to gravity.

  2. Explain how excessive exposure to radiation can cause harm.

    Radiation-induced cataracts may take many months to years to appear. Cancer 1. Studies of people exposed to high doses of radiation have shown that there is a risk of cancer induction associated with high doses. 2.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work