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The different ways in which organisms use ATP

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Introduction

The different ways in which organisms uses ATP ATP is an immediate source of energy as it can be readily hydrolysed into ADP and Pi and releases energy in the process. It is very adapted for this role as it is easily reformed from ADP and Pi and only stores small amount of energy that is easily manageable, so that no energy is wasted. All living organisms require energy in order to remain alive; as a result ATP plays many important roles in processes that are essential to life. ATPs are used in photosynthesis and respiration to help activate molecules and allowing enzyme catalysed reactions to occur more readily. For example, during glycolysis, a phosphate molecule is donated from ATP to a glucose molecule to form phsphorylated glucose. ...read more.

Middle

This is because neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine after they have stimulated protein channels on the post-synaptic membrane are promptly broken down by enzymes into their component molecules - ethanoic acid and choline. These then have to be recycled in the pre-synaptic knob to reform acetylcholine which requires ATP, to ensure that transmission of impulses across the synapse can continue. ATP plays a very important role in the transport of molecules across membranes as it provides the energy for active transport. In order to transport molecules against their concentration gradient, there are specific transport proteins in the cell membrane which the molecules can bind to, when these proteins are activated by an ATP, they changes shape and as a result, transport the molecule across the membrane. ...read more.

Conclusion

to their original angle, so that the myosin heads are ready to attach to another binding site further along the actin filament and flex their heads in unison to pull the actin filament along. ATP is also required in secretion as it form the lysosomes necessary for secretion of cell products such as enzymes. This is very important in phagocytosis - one of the main immune responses where a white blood cell engulfs the pathogen within a phagocytic vacuole in the cytoplasm, a lysosome then fuses with it so the lysosomal enzymes contained within breaks down the pathogen and destroys it. ATP provides an immediate source of energy for many processes vital for life; as a result, they play an important role in all aspect of living organisms' lives and without which, there would probably be no life on Earth. ...read more.

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