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BAA Human Resources.

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Introduction

BAA HUMAN RESOURCES People BAA is committed to inspiring people to excel through demonstrating the highest levels of personal performance, clear leadership and recognition of significant achievement. They aim to create an innovate environment which encourages teamwork, sharing and learning, and open communications, and which produces measurable performance improvement. They are also committed to providing a healthy and safe working environment, and to giving safety and security the highest priority at all times. Recruitment BAA adapt a rigorous recruitment and selection process to ensure that successful applicants thrive within the organisation. This process will vary depending on the position, but will usually include the completion of an application form and a selection interview. For graduate recruitment the process also includes assessment centres and psychometric testing. A number of different skills are required for the different positions to which they recruit. In general terms, they look for motivated, enthusiastic individuals who will thrive in a continually changing environment. Motivation of employees BAA motivate employees in a number of ways, examples of which include giving staff the opportunity to develop their skills through training and development programmes. They operate a policy of internal promotion. Staff vacancies are advertised internally first, to ensure that individuals within the company are given the opportunity to develop and gain experience in different parts of the organisation. Enterprise BAA is currently embarking on a significant change programme to drive increased business effectiveness through use of technology. They are developing computerised systems to create a technical environment, enabling the business to achieve greater efficiencies, as well as redesigning their processes and organisation structures to minimise cost and maximise their service to customers. This constitutes a major change in working practices. As with any change management programme there will be some redeployment and retraining. Enterprise will deliver better management data including baseline human resources figures, from which it is intended to report future progress. ...read more.

Middle

By offering customers what they want, BAA can maximise commercial returns, making it possible to keep airlines' charges low and invest in airport infrastructure, It is no accident that the UK is the only country in the world where major airport infrastructure can be provided at no cost to the tax-payer. In the event, the initial effect on airport sales was at the bottom end of BAA's predictions. Research showed widespread confusion among passengers about the new regime. Many believed that perfume was affected in the same way as liquor and tobacco. And many were confused about the precise composition for customs purposes of the EU, especially with regard to EU territories, such as the Canary Islands, that do not fall within the customs union. BAA airport shops continue to offer products (with the exception of certain low-price brands of liquor and cigarettes) to EU passengers at duty and tax-free prices, sharing the cost of paying duty and VAT with retailers and suppliers in order to maintain an attractive value proposition. In the short-term, BAA communicated this proposition to customers through a vigorous marketing campaign. BAA stressed that passengers travelling outside the EU would see no change whatsoever. BAA introduced a perfume price promise, guaranteeing lowest prices and offering 40% off high Street prices. BAA zoned products in the duty-free shops to give a clear message to passengers about what products they could buy. BAA reduced and simplified the number of messages at the airports, including leafleting at check-in to provide destination-specific purchasing information, an advertorial campaign across a wide range of publications, and an airport tabloid newspaper. For the longer-term, BAA have taken a number of measures designed to increase the size of their market. BAA are extending to all their UK airports the concept of combined domestic and international departure lounges, so that domestic UK travellers have access for the first time to a wide range of products at tax-free prices. ...read more.

Conclusion

BAA's Scottish airports BAA's Scottish airports, Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow, handled a total of 14.4 million (13.8 million) passengers during the year, up 4.3%. As expected, Edinburgh saw the greatest increase in traffic, encouraged by the opening of the Scottish Parliament in July 1999. In mid-1999, there was the largest ever increase in direct air services between Europe and Scotland with new and increased services from all three airports. In addition to six new international routes into Europe, larger aircraft and increased frequency added more than 17,000 additional seats every week, up 30% on the previous season. New direct routes included Edinburgh to Frankfurt, Vienna and Basle; Glasgow to Paris and Paphos; and Aberdeen to Oslo. Domestic services have also been boosted with daily flights from Aberdeen to Humberside and Glasgow to Humberside and Norwich. Each of the Scottish airports has benefited from improvements to airport facilities and road access. At Aberdeen, a �1.6 million project to relocate the cargo operation has considerably relieved traffic congestion on and around the terminal forecourt. At Glasgow, the company completed a two-year, �10 million runway refurbishment and resurfacing programme in March. This was carried out with minimum disruption to airport operations by carrying out as much work as possible at night. The greatest transformation has taken place at Edinburgh where the Secretary of State for Scotland, Rt. Hon. Dr John Reid, opened the latest phase of the �54 million terminal extension in May 2000. The airport now has 46 check-in desks, centralised security search and a common departure lounge for domestic and international passengers with much improved shopping and catering facilities, including a name synonymous with Edinburgh -Jenners - the oldest independent department store in the UK. Additional investments at Edinburgh include �26 million to widen access roads and �12.5 million for a new international arrivals hall which is scheduled to open in 2001. BAA HUMAN RESOURCES UNIT 2 1 ...read more.

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