• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

30th October - 24th November 1914. First Battle of Ypres.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

30th October - 24th November 1914. First Battle of Ypres. As the 'Race to the Sea' drew to a close, the British made one last attempt to turn the Germans' northern flank. An advance between La Bass�e and Armenti�res on 12 October made good progress initially but was soon opposed by eight newly formed infantry divisions (the Fourth Army, under Duke Albrecht of W�rttemberg). The British fell back to prepared positions and their accurate firepower brought the enemy action to an end. By the time the Battle of Ypres began a few days later the formation of a line running from Switzerland to the Channel had been completed. The subsequent autumn fighting in Flanders extended from the sea at Nieuport to the La Bass�e canal, almost 45 miles away in a direct line. ...read more.

Middle

The Belgians put up much stronger resistance than had been expected but could not hold their position. They fell back to the Dixmunde-Nieuport railway line as the Germans crossed the Yser on 24 October. Further progress was brought to a halt when, five days later, the Belgians opened the sluices at Nieuport and let in the sea in front of them. Elsewhere on the line to La Bass�e the British and French maintained their positions. The German action was renewed on 30 October on a smaller scale on the front from Gheluvelt, five miles to the east of Ypres, to the Messines Ridge. To the north of this line, where I Corps (Haig) was positioned, the situation was very uncertain for a time and at Gheluvelt itself the Germans broke through, although they were soon driven out again. ...read more.

Conclusion

The centre of the attack was astride the Menin Road, with Ypres itself being the principle objective. South of the road the British successfully withstood the continuous German attacks, but to the north they broke through. Fortunately the Germans hesitated at this critical point even though there was nothing infront of them apart from a line of British guns. A counter-attack by an improvised force, which included cooks and batmen, was a success and Ypres, a symbol of Allied resistance, was saved. Although the crisis was over, fighting continued until 24 November, the last day of the Battle of Ypres. Casualties were severe on both sides with the loss of irreplaceable professional manpower. The British suffered losses of 50,000 men killed of wounded; the French and Germans casualties were much higher. As the fighting subsided, open combat was replaced by the trench, which dominated the Western Front until 1918. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. The Battle of Passchendaele (The Third Battle of Ypres)

    At the same time Headquarters knew that due to the quality of the German defences, they would need to have a series of huge, carefully planned attacks. During the meetings, Gough failed to pay attention to the information about the Gheluvelt plateau, the key to the German defences.

  2. Britain and the Western Front.

    undamaged from planned artillery bombardments, which created a funnelled effect of troops in areas of gaps within the barbed wire. This caused mass casualties of British soldiers, around 57,000, due to the undamaged areas of barbed wire creating a confluence of troops entering German fire.

  1. Pre 1914 War Poetry - The Drum and Drummer Hodge analysed.

    The first line carries on the idea of deception; that they are selling their liberty, and the second line indicates that it's for nothing. 'Charms' is also a word linked with deception, such as when someone can "charm" another to do something, and the use of the word 'charms' is also linked to the idea that war is seducing.

  2. Why did Britain win the battle of Britain?

    This day saw the one major intervention by Luftflotte 5 in the battle with an attack on the north of England. Believing the strength of Fighter Command to be concentrated away in the south, raiding forces from Denmark and Norway ran into strong resistance.

  1. The Battle of Britain.

    Churchill knew that people would relate to and therefore sympathize with such young men. The sacrifice of 'the young' is a powerful image, which is why it is partially an attempt to draw America into the war on Britain's side.

  2. The popular myth of the Battle of Britain quickly emerged during the early part ...

    Also a few other general facts that made up the myth were that because the British prevented Germany from invading therefore the pilots were seen as heroic and it was the beginning of the end for the Third Reich (Nazi Germany)

  1. War at Sea.

    Ships commanded by Rear Admiral Hood cover his withdrawal. Also Admiral Jellicoe sent 3 battlecrusiers to aid Beatty. At 5:35PM these ships open fire on Admiral Hippers ships which results in the Lutzow being badly damaged and hitting 2 light cruisers the Wiesbaden and Pillau. Jellicoe who made his battle plans on poor intelligence from his warships attempts a

  2. A Critical Analysis of

    They bravely push on to the bloody fourth stanza where they lose the majority of the "six hundred" to the overpowering opposition. The cavalry retreat back through the valley where they had previously been. This is shown by the repetition of most of stanza three.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work