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A Close Analysis of Act Two Scenes Four and Five, 'Educating Rita'.

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A Close Analysis of Act Two Scenes Four and Five, 'Educating Rita'. In Act Two Scene Four, we see Rita coming in late to Frank's tutorial, which leads to a discussion about whether she should come or not at all. In the end of that scene, Frank gives her some poetry to criticise, the author of which turns out to be him. In Scene Five, when Rita bursts into his office unannounced, she tells him that she loves his poetry. This, however, due to Frank's sarcasm, leads to an argument that sees Rita storming out, which leads the audience to thinking that maybe their so called 'relationship' is over. In Scene Four, Frank tells Rita that he called the hairdressing shop, where she worked: '...When you were so late I phoned the shop...The hairdresser's shop. Where you work. Or should I say, worked...' and Rita replies that she now worked in a bistro. Frank then says: 'You didn't tell me.' And Rita replies 'Didn't I? I thought I did. I was telling someone.' This implies that she now tells other people things, whereas before she used to tell Frank everything. He points this out, and Rita seems surprised that Frank cares so much about where she works. ...read more.


Rita then angrily gives the excuse of her exam being the reason she's coming to his tutorials. Frank tells her that she'd 'sail right through it anyway, you really don't have to put in the odd appearance out of sentimentality; I'd rather you spared me that...' This I can imagine he says quite lazily while sipping alcohol. Rita then replies back angrily; 'If you could stop pouring that junk down your throat...it might be worth comin' here.' Rita explains that she understands literary criticism, and Frank gives her a volume of poetry written by him. This perhaps shows that even though they are slightly angry at each other, he still trusts her enough to show her his personal creation, something that his wife presumably left him for. Then we come on to Scene Five. Rita comes into his office, and explains to him that she thinks his poetry are masterpieces; '...This is brilliant. They're witty. They're profound. Full of style.' And they go through a little joke about how Rita wouldn't have understood it in the beginning, but she understands it now; '...I wouldn't have understood it, Frank...' to which Frank replies 'Oh, I've done a fine job on you, haven't I.' ...read more.


The scene then ends. These two scenes are important in understanding the development of Rita and Frank's relationship because it shows powerful emotions between them both. Rita seems annoyed that he doesn't seem to like her being independent with her knowledge, and Frank is upset because she no longer needs him. He feels affection for her, because she is fresh and young, and not like the other students, at least, she wasn't, until he taught her. He might now regret teaching her because he changed her individuality, and he loved her for that, the thing that has now changed. The fact that they even had this argument shows that they both want to know where they stand in the relationship, otherwise either one of them could have walked away. When she tells him his poetry is not 'worthless, talentless shit...and gives publishing a bad name...' she wants to contradict him, because she for one cares about what he thinks of himself, and his self-esteem does seem to be low. This shows that however much he doesn't try and show his emotions towards her in this scene, she still cares for him, but just not in the way he'd hoped she would. Word Count: 1,259 words. (Without Title) Zeenat Rahim 10B.1 ...read more.

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