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Compare several pre - 20th century poems and say if they are socially and historically interesting.

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Introduction

Compare several pre - 20th century poems and say if they are socially and historically interesting All these poems have something in common. Every poem has its own socially or historically interest to it. Blake is a man who is socially and historically ahead of his time. William Blake wrote 'The Little Black Boy' at the time of the slave trade. Straight away in this poem Blake writes it as if it is coming from a child's voice. For example 'my mother bore me'. This shows that 'bore' tells us that this is a pre 20th century word for gave birth to. This also shows that if Blake writes it in a child's voice then people will take notice, but if it is in an adult's voice then people won't bother to listen. Blake is also trying to point out that black people and white people are equal. For example 'I am black but my soul is white'. This shows that they are not the same because blacks were different in those days. William Blake also says that if you are black then no one will care for you or take notice of you. ...read more.

Middle

This shows me that blacks can take the heat and whites burn. The black boy wants to be like the white boy. For example 'be like him' and then 'he will love me'. This wouldn't happen in those days that's why this poem is historically interesting because times have changed and white and black people are now equal. In 'The Little Black Boy' William Blake is criticising the slave trade, and in 'The Little Vagabond' William Blake is criticising the Church, so these two poems are similar. They are also similar on how William Blake writes both these poems in a child's voice. This 'Little Vagabond' lives in the 'cold church' were it is very emotional. Yet again Blake is catching your attention by writing it in a child's voice. For example 'Dear Mother'. This shows that he is telling his feelings to God. Blake puts across the idea that if people want people to go to church then they have to make it more appealing. For example 'give us ale, a pleasant fire and food'. This shows me that the church is not doing this therefore children are going to 'ale-houses' and thinking 'it's healthy, pleasant and warm'. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example 'has not anything to show more fair'. This shows me that there is nothing as beautiful as this view. Wordsworth is also saying that you would be dull not to realise that this is a beautiful sight. For example 'dull he would be of soul who could pass by'. This shows me that Wordsworth has taken time to stop and that he felt something and wanted to write it down to share his experience. Wordsworth is saying the morning is 'silent' and 'bare'. This shows that he doesn't mean there's nothing there he means the ugliness has gone and there is only beauty left. Wordsworth talks about how he can see 'fields'. I find this historically interesting because you would never find a field in London today. Wordsworth also comments on how the air is 'smokeless'. This shows that normally you would see fumes coming out of the chimneys in the day but you don't at dawn. The poet also comments on when the sun comes up it lights the 'valley, rock, or hill'. I find this historically interesting because this tells me its open landscape. Wordsworth is making London into a human by using 'heart is lying still'. This shows me that London is not pumping away with its river traffic and people. ...read more.

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