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Dear Thora, Congratulations on getting the part of Doris in our forthcoming production of 'A Cream Cracker Under The Settee'.

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Introduction

16, Abbots Close Edgware London LE5 1EH Thora Hird 126 Stobba Close Edgware London LH5 1HE Dear Thora Congratulations on getting the part of Doris in our forthcoming production of 'A Cream Cracker Under The Settee'. This play is set in modern times, and is about an old woman called Doris, in her seventies who likes to be very clean and tidy, but because of her age, will have to move into old peoples home if she is caught cleaning. Zulema comes for home help, and Doris believes that she doesn't do her job properly. Doris goes to prove her point, by getting down her deceased husband's photo, but unfortunately falls and hurts her leg. She stays like that, and later in the day, she sadly dies. The props will include a cracked photo of Doris's husband, Wilfred, to show that she was once not lonely and used to care for someone. ...read more.

Middle

Doris feels disappointed, as there could have been a child there now to care for her, and for her to love and share life with. The costume you will wear will be an old, lilac dress with flowery patterns, with lots of creases and cuts here and there. This will help convey that Doris is old, in poor health, and cannot do much work on her own. Key moments for Doris are whilst she is talking about Zulema and Wilfred, and how she doesn't clean the place appropriately. Furthermore another key moment is when she falls off the stool whilst she is trying to get a photo down of her deceased husband. Moreover, another key moment is when Doris talks about her deceased husband. One more key point is when the policeman comes and talks to Doris. ...read more.

Conclusion

You should look light hearted, and you could have a tear drop from your eye to show Doris cared. In the section where the policeman talks to Doris you need to squint to show that she is regaining consciousness and realises that there is some one talking to her. You must use a croaky but convincing voice to show that she isn't in good shape, but she doesn't want to tell anybody. Your face should have frowns on your face to show that she is in pain. In the final section where Doris says her last few words, you need to appear extremely exhausted, and you need to talk very slowly taking breaks, and with a weary voice. Your eyes should be slowly closing, with frowns on your face. I hope my comments have helped you get a better understanding of this Character, and I look forward to seeing you at the first rehearsal on 2nd May 2003. Yours Sincerely Aaron White Director ...read more.

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